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Critical Illness Insurance

Critical illness is a term used to describe a variety of life altering and unexpected health conditions that can severely impact the way you live including working, enjoying time with family, and other activities. This category typically includes heart attack, stroke and cancer, as well as other serious illnesses like Alzheimer's disease. Unfortunately, these are all too common which is why we might want to dedicate more thought to it.
If you suffered a critical illness and if money were no object, I am sure all of us would spend every last dime we had to recover and get on with our lives. Sadly, most of us are not in such a position. Therefore, where would one get the money if there were no bottomless money pouch available? Here are some ways you can use critical illness insurance to fill a financial void.
This New Year as you make your resolutions, commit to making one that will get you healthy and fit -- financially. While setting personal resolutions have become second nature, the New Year should also be the time each of us sits down with family. Talk about what your financial goals are in 2014 and what you need to have in place to ensure that your family is protected and aware.
When someone becomes critically ill, it can become very difficult or next to impossible for them to do the day-to-day things they need to in order to run a successful business. However, all is not doom and gloom, there is a solution to this situation but it needs to be in place before someone becomes critically ill not after and it is called critical illness insurance.
This weekend a piece of Ontario history burned to the ground with the overnight loss of the St. Jacob's farmer's market. Ironically
I asked myself if I believed that suddenly becoming a widow with a twelve-and-a-half year old daughter, going through hell, coming out the other side of it upright, and subsequently remarrying was a story in itself. It was. Then I had to ask myself the really tough questions.
Recently a 97-year-old New York man left his $40 million fortune to....no one. People need to encourage their friends and family to start sharing their wishes and their wants...to make it an acceptable discussion topic.