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We tried it ourselves, for curiosity’s sake — and failed.
A new report states Canadians will “very likely” encounter some form of foreign cyber interference ahead of election day.
Leaving it up to the minister in charge to decide what is acceptable and what is not, or what is lawful and what is not, is far from a democratic and accountable model. We need review mechanisms with the necessary autonomy, independence and structure to create true accountability.
It's been one year. Saturday marked exactly 365 days since the former Conservative government introduced Bill C-51, with its controversial spy powers that experts warn are shredding our basic constitutional rights. So, where do things stand now? After intense debate, C-51 was pushed through Parliament and is now law, but its many opponents are making progress. Over the past few weeks, we have seen positive signs from the new federal government, as it has finally promised to meet calls for public consultation from Canadians, civil society and experts.
Attention is turning to what the Liberals plan to do when they formally assume office in just a couple weeks. Many Canadians will be watching very closely to see what the Liberals are planning on the reckless secret police bill introduced by the previous government.
There's a lot at stake here -- if Canada continues on the path the current government has set it on, then harmful policies on surveillance, Internet censorship, and Big Telecom dominance could be locked in place for a generation, and hold back our digital economy. Canadians deserve better.
Many Canadians are asking whether anything can be done to rein in the almost unimaginable surveillance powers revealed by Edward Snowden. From our research and consultation with privacy experts, there are a number of practical steps that can be taken to put a stop to surveillance abuses and better protect the privacy of Canadians.
Small businesses across Canada are speaking up to warn the government about the economic damage that its "secret police" Bill C-51 will inflict on our economy. If Bill C-51 is passed, it will change Canada's economic climate for the worse, notably by harming Canadian commerce, trade, and data security. This upsurge in opposition from small businesses couldn't be more timely: committee hearings on the Bill are continuing today in the Senate, while the House of Commons could hold its final vote in just days.
The Harper government’s anti-terrorism bill has a new opponent: The Firefox web browser. The Mozilla project, the open-source
Our own Steve Anderson has been invited to testify before the committee and share our community's concerns about C-51 with key decision makers. We know that when we speak out together with one voice we can change the government's mind. That's why we need your help right now.
Huge numbers of Canadians, including key Ottawa decision-makers, are pushing back hard against the government's Bill C-51, which proposes unprecedented new powers for Canada's security agencies. The bill effectively turns CSIS into a secret police force and would place every Canadian under a government microscope.
Canada's surveillance agency has admitted that it "incidentally" spies on the communications of citizens. The Communications
Since the revelations last week that the U.S. culls the phone records of millions of Americans every day and accesses the