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Customer Satisfaction

This simple technology can almost guarantee business success. From the AOL Partner Studio
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There's no shortage of options on how to run a business, but one philosophy unites all schools of thought -- give customers
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It's easier (and less expensive) to keep a customer than it is to acquire a new one. Turn that customer into a brand advocate and their worth is immeasurable. Treat them poorly and, thanks to the Internet, your brand can take a very public beating.
Why is it when I get into an UberX car, the driver rarely knows which way to go? For those who have spent more than enough time being carted around by UberX, I can confidently say that you've likely found yourself in a navigational nightmare at least once (more so with a rideshare).
With experts estimating it costs between four and 10 times more to acquire a new customer than it does to keep an existing one and the Canadian dollar taking a dive, you want to avoid churn at all costs by ensuring your customers are satisfied and will recommend your product or service to others.
According to a recent survey more Canadians than ever are becoming dissatisfied with their bank. In fact, the survey found nearly nine per cent of respondents said they will "definitely or probably" switch banks in the next 12 months, compared with seven per cent in 2014.
As a marketing professional, there is nothing I hate more than receiving any form of communication (email, Web experience, social media, mobile, whatever) and not see an obvious place where I can either opt out of the communication or protect how much information is being captured. As a consumer, I probably hate it more.
The customer experience becomes more important now than ever in a down economy. Especially when shoppers are now open to the idea of visiting your competition, unless you provided them with a shopping experience previously, that they don't want to trade. The more loyal your customers are, the better positioned you are to survive a downturn.