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cyber attacks

We tried it ourselves, for curiosity’s sake — and failed.
"The chill is real."
Are organizations incentivized to prioritize our safety, or are they more driven by self-preservation? At times, it can be the latter.
While the damage of WannaCry seems to have been limited by a "kill-switch" discovered by British computer expert, Marcus Hutchins, security experts warn that new versions of WannaCry could still proliferate. All of which begs the question: How can Canadian businesses protect themselves against falling victim to the next worldwide ransomware attack? Here are a few suggestions:
Let’s be real -- there’s nothing better than finding out a restaurant, café, or clothing store offers free Wi-Fi. Getting online quickly, easily and for free is a simple way to feel connected to our friends, coworkers, and our favourite brands. It’s the little things that make us feel valued.
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It's hard to imagine life without the Internet. Browsing the web has become so second nature to us that we share sensitive
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The health care industry is unique. Highly regulated, highly specialized, and in possession of highly confidential information, it's a natural target for cyber-attacks. With the rise of internet-connected devices and the industry lagging behind modern cyber security, now more than ever IT decision-makers in health care need to think about how to best protect patient information in the modern threat landscape.
Stories of increasingly vicious cyber-attacks have dominated the headlines this year. It seems like every day we wake up to news of another attack on the scale of the Yahoo data breach, the Democratic National Committee hack, or the NSA source code leak.
When we consider the range of cyber-threats, we generally imagine external attackers -- foreign states, criminal underworlds or lone script kiddies. But the reality is that a large proportion of vulnerabilities and "threats" that organizations face today come from legitimate network users.
If anything, the modern threat landscape encourages attacks on small, vulnerable businesses. And 60 per cent of the time, those small businesses will go under within six months of a cyber-attack. So while massive data breaches dominate the news, they only scratch the surface.
The evidence clearly points to the need for Canadian SMBs to increase their awareness of threats and ability to detect them, especially as they look to grow. Keeping these points in mind, there is always room for improvements in cyber policies and procedures, product selection and education because it doesn't look like cyber threats will be subsiding in the near future.
Earlier this year, a group of cyber criminals targeted two Canadian financial institutions with a hybrid type of malware, GozNym. The first time GozNym was ever seen, it stole millions of dollars from the unnamed Canadian financial institutions along with several U.S. banks.
Cyber attacks make global headlines on a near weekly basis and Canadian organizations are not immune. Most will remember
March is Fraud Prevention Month in Canada and it's timely to remind Canadians that everyone is vulnerable and that vigilance, knowledge and the confidence to fight back are powerful deterrents to fraud. A 2016 survey from the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada (CPA Canada) demonstrates deeply held concerns about fraud and identity theft.
Individuals and organizations that follow good cyber hygiene practices have more peace of mind. It is no different than monitoring your health and scheduling your automobile's maintenance. People who practice good cyber hygiene habits get more done, are happier and spend less time troubleshooting because they have fewer surprises.
China and Russia are seen as the worst offenders when it comes to cyber attacks, but Iran is close behind. How is it that a country such as Iran has a cyber-warfare unit with a staff of 2,400 and a budget of $76 million, and Ottawa has only allocated $95 million for our country's defence against this new form of attack?
THE CANADIAN PRESS -- OTTAWA - Canada's spy agency says cyberattacks waged via the Internet are the fastest growing form