HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

detox

Do you really have to ask why you shouldn't shoot coffee up your butt?
If you follow health tips in the media, you'd think the nutritional sciences are a mess: Is butter good for you or is it bad? Should I eat breakfast or skip it? Should I eat like a caveman? Or maybe should I eat more like a bird? So here are three popular nutrition diet trends to steer clear of -- based on the best evidence.
Juices aren't the way to go.
All humans and animals alike detox on a regular basis. It is the natural daily cycle in which our body eliminates the toxins from the food we consume, and the unhealthy atmosphere we're immersed in. Liver, kidneys, lungs, bowel and skin; they all work together to provide us with an excellent system to get rid of the things the body doesn't need.
As we soak up the festive spirit, most of us find that our self-control and restraints become lax. Intoxicated by excessive holiday eating and drinking, we may begin to plan for an improved version of ourselves in the New Year. To set out a science based plan, we first must define what is meant by the term "Detoxification."
Fortunately, not all smoothies are unhealthy or dangerous -- in fact, green smoothies, when made with the correct vegetable to fruit ratio, along with healthy fats and plant proteins, not only provide greater nutrition than many common sit-down meals, but also serve as an easy, real-food alternative to many dubious prescription medicines.
It pains me to hear the nonsense my patients are subjected to by sometimes well-meaning, yet utterly uninformed, self-taught mental health experts. Their lack of scientific training is merely a preamble ("I'm no doctor but..."). They speak with enthusiasm and authority as they peddle supplements, homeopathic tinctures, detox enemas and antioxidant smoothies, with the goal of liberating my patients from their evidence-based treatments and dollars from their wallets.
Anything that enters our bodies through direct contact with our mucosal membranes, inhaled into our lungs or touches our skin for long periods of time has the highest chance of entering our blood stream and influencing our health, for good or bad.
A startup based in British Columbia is offering Canadians a new, and effective, way to combat alcoholism. It flies in the face of Alcoholics Anonymous' "cold turkey" method, which has been shown to have a sucess rate between 5 and 10 per cent. There's just one catch: You need to keep drinking.
Meet Joanne Gerrard Young, holistic nutritionist, master raw food chef and well-being educator behind The Healing Cuisine, who happens to also be the Brady-Bündchen family and friends' private chef when they are in town (Joanne is based out of Costa Rica).