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diamond jubilee

Sixty years ago, Coronation Day was celebrated around the world. In Canada, it was declared a national holiday, marked with parades, concerts, and fireworks. Even in wartime Korea, Canadian soldiers marked the day by firing red, white, and blue-coloured smoke shells at a thoroughly confused enemy, followed by toasts to the Queen with rations of rum!
Bieber doesn't seem to know anything at all about Canada or its history. Maybe it's from being on the road too much and away from a Canadian classroom. If he wants to use his country as a marketing tool, he should learn something about it first.
Canada has lost one of its fiercest, most uncompromising, contentious and passionate pursuers of justice and equality, Mr. Charles Roach. On October 2, Roach passed away after a hard-fought battle with cancer. Of all his pursuits for a fairer and more just society, however, the most controversial of Roach's advocacy efforts was his push, since 1988, to get a Canadian court to recognize that it is a violation of individuals' constitutionally guaranteed freedom of conscience to require prospective Canadians to swear an oath of allegiance to Queen Elizabeth II.
I had written irreverently about a drunken Haida Indian in the Queen Charlotte's stealing the show by staggering and weaving on the red carpet, much to the amusement of Prince Philip who nudged the Queen to take note. The article was not appreciated. I think I became the first Royal Tour media honcho not to get a set of cufflinks in gratitude for loyal press leadership. I apparently set a poor example.
Elizabeth II stands today not only unsullied by the slightest failing of duty, and universally admired for a long and splendid reign, but illustrative of the virtues of a form of government long discarded as anachronistic, which by her devotion, discretion and monarchic dignity, stands very creditably beside the damaged and fallen idols of popular electoralism. Long live the Queen.
We just can't seem to get enough of the fashions celebs are sporting to celebrate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee -- from Kate
In Britain, the title means she defends her Church of England. But since none of her 15 other realms has a state religion, it's conveniently interpreted -- by those nations like Canada that still use the title in reference to her -- as meaning she defends freedom of religion and faith in some Supreme Power.
No other accessory symbolizes a queen better than her crown. Over the course of her 60 years as the British Commonwealth's
Like many Canadians, I will be honouring Queen Elizabeth's six decades on the throne. Inspired by Buckingham Palace's garden parties, I decided to host my very own Diamond Jubilee celebration at Montreal's famous Birks Café par Europea with an Afternoon Tea Etiquette workshop.
At the 2010 Canada Day festivities on Parliament Hill, Elizabeth started her speech by addressing the 100,000-strong audience as "fellow Canadians..." She's custodian of the Canadian Crown's democratic powers and represents the "power of the people above government and political parties." Which makes her our chief watchdog -- if mostly absent and toothless.