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disabilities

“It’s people with disabilities that are most vulnerable to COVID-19.”
Twenty-five dogs and handlers graduated this year.
A win for showcasing diverse images of girls and women.
Enrica Andrenacci is an artist, writer, soccer player and more, pursuing her dreams with gumption and drive.
We still have Paralympians in Pyeongchang representing Canada in ways that are just as, if not more, inspiring than athletes over the past several weeks.
Let's not let our celebrations of increasing visibility detract from the other hard work that is still to be done.
By ignoring the rehabilitation needs of our patients with disabilities, this national discussion fails them.
The hashtag #InvisiblyDisabledLooksLike has been used over 3,000 times.
We, the disability family, have been an afterthought -- for governments, service agencies and organizations -- for far too long. Our opinions have been sidelined, our emotions trivialized, our needs prescribed and our resources shuttered.
Even a few minutes of putting oneself in another person's shoes (or wheelchair) could make a big difference. Accessibility is a right. Just by being born we all have human rights. We don't need to do or be anything special. Equality is - or should be - ours, just because we exist.
When Rick Hansen first started his tour, the cinema in his hometown didn't have an accessibility ramp.
Ten years I have witnessed the ravaged bodies and battered spirits, heartbroken eyes of mothers who have lost their children and the anger felt by communities -- people who, in addition to mourning their dead ones and amputees, live in the middle of minefields.
"Picking on people with disabilities is not right and Canada knows it's not right."
Women with disabilities, Indigenous women, immigrant and racialized women, LGBQT women -- all of us "other" women must be at the centre of any messages about women's equality and must be at the centre of any strategy that purports to lead to equality between men and women.
How much, or how little, does it take for things to go awry as we age? Deteriorating physical and mental health, loss of loved ones, social isolation, and the progressive inability to cope with daily tasks and challenges can make people dread the so-called "golden years" rather than embrace them.
Human beings are not good at predicting how they will react in circumstances that have yet to unfold. Those of us working in healthcare understand that life-altering illness, trauma or anticipation of death can sometimes sap the will to live. In those instances, healthcare providers are called upon to commit time; time to manage distress, provide unwavering support and to assuage fear that patients might be abandoned to their hopelessness and despair. That is the essence of how medicine has traditionally responded to suffering. Stopping time by way of arranging the patient's death has never been part of that response.
I believe we all just want to leave a gentle footprint on this earth, and for me, that means striving to go to bed each night feeling I've made a difference, and hopefully left things better than the way I found them. Am I able to say that I meet that challenge each day -- definitely, "no." Life has a way of getting in the way, and as is most often the case, I'm the one who's in my own way.
Right now the strategy seems to be to make it as difficult as possible for families to navigate the system and find the care their loved one needs. There are so many rules which means that the patient isn't eligible for this or doesn't qualify for that.
Women with severe disabilities and multiple chronic conditions are screened for breast cancer less often than women with no disabilities or no chronic conditions, a new study has found.
On the International Day of People with Disability, December 3, World Vision notes that an estimated 98 per cent of children with disabilities worldwide are excluded from education. Many of these children are also hidden away due to stigma and shame.