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disruptive innovation

Not long ago I was talking with my friend Paul about the changes occurring globally within the the energy industries. We
Many companies have thrived through innovation by leveraging the global connections. The crucial question is, if companies become so successful that they start to impact local economies, job markets, real estate prices, etc., should government intervene with regulation or let free markets reign?
I believe an earth-shaking metamorphosis is underway. The good news is that the millennial generation gets it and, as natural early adopters, are blending into whatever comes along almost symbiotically as each next big thing enters their very different (from baby boomers) lives.
Like most industries in today's business world, HR is seeing a significant impact from disruptive technology -- a term coined by Harvard Business School professor and author Clayton Christensen to describe any technology that changes or disrupts an existing technology or creates a whole new industry.
As Silicon Valley increasingly turns its innovative ideas towards brownfield sectors such as financial services and transportation, many commentators have failed to recognize the different levels of innovation that are occurring in these sectors. Indeed, innovation, particularly in brownfield sectors, is much more nuanced than what was initially believed.
A "NewCo" is a new kind of organization -- one that measures its success by more than just profit. As the fully networked, information-first economy has taken hold, NewCos are creating game-changing, purpose-driven new models for business. NewCos are everywhere.
Just the other day I climbed into Uber dressed in my military uniform. The driver asks for my advice: he recently became a Canadian citizen and wants to serve in our Canadian Armed Forces. I am hard-pressed to think of a time I felt as proud to be a Canadian.
Canada is a vast country with ample resources, however political and economic machinery in this country are not open enough to create true and genuine marketplace for disruptive ideas. Cultural, artistic and intellectual innovation form the foundation of innovative economies. No nation can stay competitive and economically advanced while stagnating culturally and intellectually. Innovation requires taking risk and being open to new ideas. The biggest obstacles in the way of innovation in Canada are regressive and closed institutions.
Dave Baker is a used car salesman on a mission to make Canada a more fair and equitable place. Go ahead and take a moment. Be skeptical. It took me six months to overcome my initial aversion to the predominant narrative of auto sales. I was sure that there was a catch. There had to be a bait-and-switch somewhere along the way.
When I decided to start my own social media consulting business three years ago, I felt like I was jumping off a cliff; I could soar, or fall flat on my face. Could I pull it off? What if I didn't get enough business? What would people think? I was terrified. Going from full-time employee to entrepreneur was risky, but the upside was that I was doing what I loved. You can do it too.