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divestment

Fossil-free investment portfolios perform as well or better than their carbon-heavy counterparts.
Investors, both retail and institutional, can drive change and contribute to a more sustainable world.
Wastefully exploiting and burning fossil fuels is outdated. There's no reason to put money into industries that destroy the natural systems that make human life possible. But there are many reasons to stop giving them money.
The time has come for McGill University to do the right thing. Indifference is no longer an option on climate change. As one of Canada's greatest scientific and educational institutions, McGill University has the opportunity to show leadership, integrity and vision.
Investors are realizing that divestment doesn't mean financial losses. Thanks in part to plummeting global oil prices and the booming clean energy economy, divested portfolios have been outperforming those with investments in fossil fuels. Divestment doesn't just mean pulling your investments from fossil fuel holdings -- it also means redirecting investment dollars to alternatives like clean energy, green tech and climate solutions.
The situation in Canada is not different from the rest of the world. The country is already feeling the consequences of climate change: diminishing quality and quantity of water, increasing pollens and other allergens, coastal erosion, road and infrastructure degradation and floods. The health consequences of those climate change impacts are already being strongly felt.
"If you can believe it, my faculty pension has no ethical screens. We can invest in arms, tobacco, and so on. It's outrageous, really. But of all places in society, the university is well-positioned to lead, to find creative solutions to these complexities."
We're seeing the rise of one of the largest and fastest growing student-led environmental movements in decades. As students and youth, we know what's at stake if we don't act swiftly to move away from fossil fuels and build a sustainable world today -- after all we will inherit the mistakes being made today.
He graced our television sets with live reports from the most recent conflict between Palestine and Israel. Now that a ceasefire has been reached, British filmmaker and human rights advocate, Harry Fear, has embarked on a world talking tour. He arrived in Toronto Monday.
History will remember 2012 as the year the climate changed. That means that 2013 needs to be the year that we bring the warming back home. That's why the Canadian Youth Climate Coalition is taking a leap of faith and leaving charitable status behind. We need to take the gloves off when it comes to this fight.