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documentary film

What's a cup of coffee anyway? Well in Canada, adults drink 2.8 cups per day on average. Worldwide, coffee is a multi-billion dollar industry that supports the livelihood of countless families. Our choices affect real people.
These mountains are the most heavily mineralized mountains I have ever seen. We were literally picking up big chunks of iron and copper oxide, boulders of obsidian and crystals. One hillside we huffed up was covered almost entirely in geodes, many of which were broken open and shimmering in the sunlight. The result of all of this was visually spectacular, with every colour you can imagine, deep hues of reds, yellows, oranges, greens, purples, blacks and whites all mixed together with pockets of northern boreal old growth and deep turquoise alpine lakes.
Toronto's Caribbean Tales International Film Festival kicked-off its ninth annual season last night at the Royal Theatre
There he stood with his excellent manners telling me politely that he did not want to be in my film, or discuss his tragic case or for that matter have anything further to do with me, not now or ever. And for the next few months, cut me dead. Welcome to the cruel realities of the world of documentary making. It's supposed to get easier when you've won four Emmys.
Have you ever wondered what it would be like for a film crew to follow you day in and day out, documenting your daily rituals all in an effort to create a successful film? I have a chronic condition called Dermatillomania, which has left me scarred and disfigured on the outside, alienated and "different" on the inside.
Did you hear about the Drag Queen Ken-Barbie? It "came out" with three, count 'em, three of Barbie's dresses? Mike, a Barbie-loving, 30-something year-old man who never left home would know all about that. Barbie seems to have turned into something of a gay icon. The coming out process is two-fold: "They disclose their sexuality. They profess their love for Barbie."
Documentary was once seen as the castor oil of cinematic genres: it was supposed to be "good for you," but it didn't taste very good. Today documentary might be the coolest cultural form around, and new digital technologies are part of the reason documentaries are connecting with new audiences in innovative ways.
American documentary filmmaker James Benning's new film about the Unabomber, Stemple Pass, is one of the few true must-sees in this year's VIFF, and plays tonight for the final time. There is more than a usual amount of urgency in recommending audiences get out to see the film while they can, since it is unlikely that it will screen theatrically elsewise: although Benning regularly has films in the VIFF, none, to my knowledge, have yet returned for an engagement in Vancouver. The film may also never see distribution on home video, which is possibly a good thing; the challenges and rewards of Benning's cinema are such that you pretty much have to see his films on the big screen, with an audience, where there is no option of pausing the film, no way to dodge the demands placed on you.
I'm often asked: Do you really believe in change? And while I acknowledge that it's hard to be hopeful sometimes, I do, undeniably, believe that a better world is always possible. This is where documentaries play a significant cultural sociopolitical role. They are the narratives of our times.
We had a small window of opportunity when Babz could travel and we took it. We couldn't wait, we couldn't plan -- we just followed what was happening now. Yes, it meant that we had to live with the unexpected and the unconventional story twists. But that's life -- which can't be forecasted before the cameras start rolling.
We are now half-way through the screening. When Sean hears the victim describing years of pain she endured from the six stab wounds he inflicted, he sighs and says quietly: "I can't believe I caused so much suffering," He is nervous but excited that the film is coming out soon.