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domestic abuse

The pandemic and holidays are exacerbating volatile situations.
The 5-year-old from New Zealand wanted to honour his nan.
The UBC graduate and lawyer was blinded by her husband after asking for a divorce.
Leitch calls it a “common sense policy” to “strengthen the rights of women.”
Caring for our veterans, particularly those suffering from PTSD, is undoubtedly an important issue. However, a conversation around mental health shouldn't overshadow men's violence against women and children. More concerning, shifting the narrative towards mental health and further away from men's violence make it even more difficult to hold perpetrators of similar acts of violence accountable.
Last week, physicians in Ontario were stunned to hear that one of their colleagues, who by all accounts was a bright vivacious woman, had died, allegedly due to domestic abuse, or Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) as it's now called. She leaves behind young children, and a legacy of kindness, health care advocacy and caring.
"It's a huge step for women's rights."
We see celebrities who we admire as "friends". We support their work, we cheer them on, and we ardently defend them when someone makes an accusation against them. In the eyes of millions of people, Johnny Depp is a hero, an onscreen buddy, and who wants to believe that your best film buddy abused his wife?
I'm just asking for all of us to take a second and really analyze what's happening when we knee-jerk defend a celebrity. Do we truly think they're incapable of doing the act in question? Or do we just need to believe that we didn't invest our love and energy in a bad place? Only children think that someone they love is infallible because of that love. So let's grow up.