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double mastectomy

The actress did the procedure two years ago.
Women diagnosed with breast cancer in one breast sometimes opt to remove both breasts through a double mastectomy as a preventative
It has only been a couple weeks since the surgery, a double mastectomy, and my body is still in recovery mode. On some mornings, I can hear Nate playing downstairs with his dad and I feel my heart swell with happiness. "How lucky I am to be a part of this family," I think. On other mornings, on those when the pain is bad, I think how sad it is that I am in this bed and missing out on the cuteness that is surely happening downstairs. My chest is sore, but mostly it is numb. Watching Nate run and play and laugh reminds me that the surgery may have (temporarily) broken my body, but it certainly did not touch my heart, nor my capacity to feel love.
Angelina had a double mastectomy, moms are misbehavin' at Disney and we all need more naps. Baby mugging is big and Pilates is a lot tougher than you think. That's what caught my attention this week.
I applaud Angelina Jolie for her bravery and willingness to share her experience with the public. When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, six years ago, I was not aware of the extent of my family's history with the disease. I know how it feels to be there. And even if you're a movie star, those decisions remain the same.
Angelina Jolie has just gone public with the news that she had a preventative double mastectomy. As a BRCA1 gene mutation carrier, she had an 87% higher risk of breast cancer. In January, I also found out that I have the BRCA1 gene mutation. But for me, the test came late, after I had been diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer that had already spread to my lymph nodes.
I have been a cancer survivor for a little over five years. Throughout my journey, I have remained positive, sometimes scared, and at times frustrated. The base of it all, though, is my belief that I will thrive and live a healthy, full life. No matter how many rounds of chemo or radiation you have to endure, or follow-up surgeries you have to undergo, take heart.
My journey through breast cancer started five years ago this month. It was in April of 2007 that I was sent to a specialized