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Economic Action Plan

"The final circle [of Hell] is basically sitting in a room watching Canada Action Plan ads over and over again on a loop
Missing from the plan, however, are important policy enablers for the Canadian labour force. Canada is faced with a changed economy and the labour force has to be more flexible and mobile than ever to meet the demands of employers.
If you're not a fan of the Conservative government or its Economic Action Plan then you'll probably love this clever bit
Too often, these Economic Action Plan projects seemed like giant lottery tickets, bought with our money, and failing to pay off. Government -- federal, provincial and local -- should stay out of the way, and let investors take the risk on these "easy" money economic development schemes.
Rick Mercer really is a national treasure. And, in case you think this is off base, you may want to know that when asked
Economic Action Plan 2014 is what Canada needs. It continues to support jobs and growth; supports families and communities; and highlights the road to a balanced budget in 2015 without cutting transfers to individuals or the provinces.
Stuffed into the 309-page Conservative budget implementation act, Bill C-4, that was tabled last month, are a slew of drastic changes to the federal labour relations system, which will affect the health and safety provisions, human rights protections, and collective bargaining rights of federal workers. As its number suggests, Bill C-4 is truly explosive.
We know that chronic homelessness is a challenge that is complicated by social issues like addiction and mental health. Safe, stable housing is an essential element in addressing homelessness and the problems that can often come with it. This is why the HPS takes a Housing First approach with a focus on chronic homelessness.
Canada took the wrong approach in its tackling of unemployment during the recession, a report by the University of Calgary's
Shit Harper Did (SHD) is looking for a job – and not just any job. The collective behind videos criticizing the Harper government
Shit Harper Did (SHD), the viral collective that made headlines during the last federal election, aired a new TV ad Friday
OTTAWA — These scientists aren’t asking for much. They just want access to a road, the ability to get in a boat and keep
Trudeau is trying to find a new niche for the Liberal Party. A preliminary look indicated that he is trying to take the Conservative party's old right-of-centre spot on the ideological spectrum. With fewer differences between the two parties, Trudeau's youth and vitality may come as an asset in 2015 when Canadians go to the polls.
Something largely overlooked by wide media coverage of the federal government's Economic Action Plan 2013 was that it marked a significant change in the way we will tackle homelessness in this country. The policy lens dramatically shifts from supports for "helping the homeless" to "ending homelessness."
Shit Harper Did (SHD), the viral phenomenon that captured the digital zeitgeist during the 2011 federal election campaign
First published at The Prince Arthur Herald Jeffrey Simpson is absolutely correct (and so is Bruce Stewart) when he observes
If there was a theme in the recent federal budget, it was how chock full it was with new corporate welfare. The underlying