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email

Email, like a bag of chips, is addictive. Even with the most discipline, you will break. Having email on your phone is the equivalent to walking around with an open bag of chips with you. All the time. It doesn't sound very healthy, does it?
In 2015, 205 billion email messages were sent and received daily, according to the Radicati Group. Messages are sent and received from computers, mobile, tablets and many other devices. The current U.S. election has seen Hillary Clinton's presidential race mired in an email scandal involving the user of a personal email server while she served as secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.
Your inbox is where your email arrives -- it's not where it is supposed to live. Some of those emails are well past their due date. Yet we still keep them in our inbox.
At work, it's hard to concentrate on the task at hand with the constant pinging or dinging of incoming emails. While many complain about the number of time-wasting messages, protesting seems futile.
When someone sends a mass email saying they are leaving, they often haven't thought things through. They are probably having an emotional reaction to what is likely a very emotional situation.
Most people have experienced the negative aspect of "buyer beware" for themselves or when purchasing for their company. How can you minimize being left high and dry if a company you do business with goes bankrupt or becomes insolvent? The old adage "always prepare for the worst and hope for the best" remains true.