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email

A few years ago, after coming back from probably the first vacation where I disconnected completely, a distinct and unpleasant
Email, like a bag of chips, is addictive. Even with the most discipline, you will break. Having email on your phone is the equivalent to walking around with an open bag of chips with you. All the time. It doesn't sound very healthy, does it?
In 2015, 205 billion email messages were sent and received daily, according to the Radicati Group. Messages are sent and received from computers, mobile, tablets and many other devices. The current U.S. election has seen Hillary Clinton's presidential race mired in an email scandal involving the user of a personal email server while she served as secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.
Your inbox is where your email arrives -- it's not where it is supposed to live. Some of those emails are well past their due date. Yet we still keep them in our inbox.
At work, it's hard to concentrate on the task at hand with the constant pinging or dinging of incoming emails. While many complain about the number of time-wasting messages, protesting seems futile.
The good news is yes you can! Right now building an engaged email list directly from your Facebook efforts is one of the
When someone sends a mass email saying they are leaving, they often haven't thought things through. They are probably having an emotional reaction to what is likely a very emotional situation.
A reoccurring concern I get quite often as a growth marketer (or growth hacker, for those in the know), is: "I have customers
Most people have experienced the negative aspect of "buyer beware" for themselves or when purchasing for their company. How can you minimize being left high and dry if a company you do business with goes bankrupt or becomes insolvent? The old adage "always prepare for the worst and hope for the best" remains true.
Our always-on world means we face ever increasing pressure to tackle on more work than we ever have before. People who travel for business are particularly impacted by this shift, having to juggle doubled workloads, business meetings, travel time and personal commitments.
"I'll just text them." The key word in this sentence is the word "just." Texting is a terrific way for your tween to ask
Checking your email before getting out of bed, taking a Facebook lunch break, checking texts every time the phone beeps, app updates, peaking at your phone as you put the kids to bed. Does any, or all of this, sound familiar?
Don't get me wrong, email is both a blessing and a curse, but it needs to be used thoughtfully, in the same way that you wouldn't barge into a conversation in progress and blurt out the first thing that comes to mind. It can quickly shift the conversation off-course and simply be off-putting. An email can interrupt in the same way, so you want to use it intelligently.
Just like a postcard, an email passes through a lot of different people's easy access. The average email is fully stored and searchable on about six computers. Astonishingly however, lawyers, accountants, political leaders and financial professionals transmit highly confidential information by email.
Real work has to get done, and what are the costs if you don't spend time listening and communicating with your team? Well, the answer is that the costs are surprisingly high: rising levels of employee burnout, for starters. Burnout, our DMS indexing finds, is reflected in high engagement scores, which are accompanied by low value and low trust scores.
Shipley and Schwalbe provide an email exchange example between a lawyer in London, England and a secretary that got published in British newspapers. The lawyer, who specializes in computer law and electronic commerce, had lunch with a secretary at their law firm. The secretary accidentally spilled ketchup on his pants.
I believe the future of leisure -- if not luxury -- is escape from ubiquitous connectivity. People are going to pay big money to get out of mobile phone range in the near future. I predict that "no signal" will be as common a sign of our generation's holidays as "no vacancy" was to our parents' vacations.
Proponents of Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) have touted it as a giant leap for economic efficiency in e-commerce by making spam illegal. And CASL does list the promotion of "efficiency" as its purpose. But contrary to the good results this efficiency may bring, CASL could have a decimating effect on charities. Here's how.
The forward button is like the penny, or the cigarette lighter in a car. At one time it may have been a good idea, but times change and Gmail, Yahoo, and Outlook need to change. If you have been guilty being a serial forwarder, it's not too late, you can become a good friend once again by following these simple steps.