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employees

A large part of wellness is equality. When an organization develops feelings of pride, trustworthiness and respect, as well as welcoming ideas and building good fellowship, it will encourage women to move past the glass ceiling and create a foundation that can reduce stress and mental-health issues in the workplace.
We have been raised all of our lives with the world trying to suppress who we are and telling us who we ought to be to fit in. How bizarre is it that we try to change who we are, to try and fit, versus just being more of ourselves and finding the opportunity that actually fits us?
A few years back, I got the opportunity of a lifetime that ended up shaping how I feel about employee recognition. One day
n the early days of 1-800-GOT-JUNK? my hiring decisions were based on convenience: Are you my friend? Do you have a pulse? Can you drive a truck? I was desperate for bodies and hired almost anyone who came along. Hiring this way worked in the short term, but ended up being a disaster.
It must be a struggle, having to listen to scary words you don't like from little people you don't respect. Almost like you don't think you should have to listen, by virtue of your hard-won experience of giving up on anything but the bottom line, and wish that all of us employee-children would just be quiet and respect you.
Everyone is talking about millennials: How do they work? What do they want? How do we hire them? How do we keep them happy? All these questions are for good reason: in a decade they will make up three quarters of our workforce.
Imagine what it would be like to feel confident and knowledgeable about the work you do because your boss keeps you well
I will admit, I was rather nervous. My speech wasn't until 3 p.m. My contact at Google came to the lobby to get me and almost immediately my nerves disappeared. We laughed, talked and it was very evident how much he appreciated me coming to share my story and inspire his team.
We made the mistake of overlooking the "fit factor" before, and morale and productivity plunged. It was difficult to turn it all around. Now we prioritize compatibility during the hiring process -- we want people who work hard and play hard together. Attention to culture fit has not only made our company a better place to work, it's boosted our ROI.
With the exception of Prince Edward Island, no province or territory guarantees a minimum number of paid sick days for employees. Across the country, young people, seniors and low-wage workers are the hardest hit. Less than half of young and older employees work in jobs that provide paid sick days. The lower an employee's pay, the less likely they are to be covered by a voluntary sick days policy. This needs to change.
As technology, culture and social norms are all changing rapidly, employers need talent that can combine technical know-how with general capabilities, or soft skills. As such, hiring managers are now looking for more than IQ and EQ in prospective employees.
Think back to the last time you arrived home and told your family you'd had a bad day. You probably expected them to cut you some slack, and perhaps forgive you for being in a bad mood. Why do we do that? Why do we behave the worst with the people we love the most?
When I see a small business plugging away all the while continuing their charitable and community-spirited endeavours (often in the face of near-insurmountable odds), it behooves all of us to reconsider what it means to be "productive."
Digital literacy is becoming essential for most jobs. Keeping up with the trends and technologies of how people communicate and share information is also essential for career success. Once upon a time, reading and writing were considered the basic skills for most jobs. Digital literacy has become the new literacy.
In the wake of Paris, employers must remain alert to the potential "emotional aftermath" of terrorist attacks among employees. Such events can cause considerable potential trauma and anxiety for workers, and employers have a responsibility to ensure that the workplace remains a venue of safety, security and open discourse.
Technology is not a nice-to-have for the millennial generation; it's a deal breaker. And considering that by 2030 75 per cent of the workforce will be millennials, it's something to take seriously. Millennials' technology expectations, coupled by their social media, mobile computing and app usage, are spreading into the workplace.
I often get asked whether one has to cover sick days for personal caregivers or nannies. I usually have the same response: it depends. What did you agree to when she first started working? This is a difficult topic, but it is important to think about it at the outset of the relationship.
A one-month trial period could require employees to track their hours and discuss the results with their supervisor, similar to how a consultant may discuss her or his monthly invoice with a client. In adopting this one-month trial period, employees who work outside of professional service and consulting firms could benefit from various consultants' practices.
A strong corporate culture is the DNA of any organization. From physical office space to the way colleagues at all levels interact in an organization, the highest performing cultures are ones that empower employees to learn from their mistakes and grow.
More than half of Canadians don't mind handling work-related matters on their own time. More than half. A new Workmonitor survey from Randstad Canada revealed some troubling insights about Canadian workers' lack of ability -- or lack of willingness -- to leave their work at the office.