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encryption

Many in the tech industry are lining up against efforts to crack their communications services.
In the wake of the tragedy in Paris, there is a question in the media asking if the terrorists used encryption. To continue using the internet as you know it, you have to use encryption. Unless you want to have your medical health history online for all to read, and end shopping online altogether, we rely on encryption to protect our information.
Last week, a story appeared that seemed to come out of the pages of a science fiction novel. A team of researchers in Switzerland developed a new way to store digital data. Instead of hard drives, chips, or crystals, they used the genetic material found in all living organisms, DNA. On top of that, they were able to show the information could last for at least 2,000 years.
All the tools I recommend are open source, means you don't have to trust me, you can download the source code and look at it yourself before using it. They are absolutely required for protecting your personal, and business data from unauthorized eavesdropping, which happens by default for anything you do online.
The government didn't open its ears on telecom on its own. It took Canada's largest-ever online campaign and sustained, widespread, solutions-based engagement to make it happen. We'll need that to continue, and we'll need to bring that energy to privacy, free expression online, and other issues of the day.
It's been just a week since OpenMedia.ca and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA) announced a constitutional challenge to stop illegal government spying against law-abiding Canadians -- and already the response from Canadians has been remarkable.
Privacy Commissioners, rightfully, seem more incensed than ever when yet another loss of personal information occurs. Whether
Research In Motion, the Waterloo, Ontario-based maker of the BlackBerry, has found itself caught in the crossfire of the