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entrapment

Aaron Driver died in obscure and tragic circumstances, and we may never know what really happened to him. Nevertheless, asking questions and demanding answers can help us to learn from the past and move forward. Linking the case of Aaron Driver to the question of radicalization is a simplistic and misleading narrative. Demanding answers about the FBI's role in his death, however, is more crucial than ever.
I have full confidence in the ability of our authorities to protect us from those who intend to harm us and hold them to account. But one thing worries me about the way today's authorities locate, arrest or even kill terror suspects, and it was recently highlighted in a B.C. judge's argument against the RCMP.
Last week, Justice Catherine Bruce, a judge from British Columbia, made history in Canada and in North America in general. She ruled that John Nutall and Amanda Korody, two Canadian convicted on terrorism charges, were instead entrapped by the RCMP. The unusual factor here isn't that entrapment was used, but the decision of the judge to accept it as one.
I don't begrudge Tom Morino his duty to provide a full and robust defense for his client, home-grown terror suspect John Nuttall. However, a recent claim that Nuttall and his co-conspirator Amanda Korody may have been entrapped into a plot of mass murder, the existence of which they do not deny, is simply ludicrous.