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epilepsy

It's in everyone's best interests to try to set the record straight.
We know that people who have epilepsy are not demonically possessed, but the neurological disorder remains a mystery for far too many people.
As marijuana marches towards legalization in Canada, researchers are digging ever deeper into its potential therapeutic benefits. For people suffering from epilepsy it could mean reaching back to the wisdom of the ancients to deliver a modern form of relief.
It's difficult for those with chronic medical conditions to be dependent on prescription drugs but that becomes unbearable when they also have to worry about their drug supplies running out. There is a world wide shortage of many drugs which governments are seemingly doing little to alleviate. The current Canadian crisis is impacting those with epilepsy and many with bipolar disorder. Health Canada's response appears to be callous disregard.
For Isabel Estrada, who has danced since she was ten years old, epilepsy didn't simply mean having seizures; it meant something she loved, something she had intended to do professionally, was put in doubt.
When my son Griffin was diagnosed with epilepsy at two years old, I mourned his loss of minor hockey and other organized sports -- activities I assumed he'd never play. Thankfully, when Griffin was five, his mother found the Game On program offered at London's Epilepsy Support Centre
When my husband began having seizures several years ago, one of the things that struck me was the reaction of people around him. Certainly there were almost always people who wanted to help, but there were many more who were horrified by what was happening. Their fear inserted itself into the situation like a physical presence.
What causes early menopause or premature ovarian aging? This unique situation may occur from lifestyle factors, medical treatment or genetic predisposition. Early menopause can also be the result of an autoimmune disease.
I'm an endurance athlete with epilepsy. We exist! I've been an active soul my entire life. When I was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2007, I did my absolute best to keep participating in the endurance sports I love.
Scientific research into the seizure-suppressing effects of the cannabinoids was pioneered by Karler and Turkanis at the University of Utah. Working in animals, they showed that CBD -- which doesn't make you high -- was as good as THC at suppressing seizures.
With the giant influx of health apps on the market it was only a matter of time before chronic disorders such as epilepsy began drawing the attention of application programmers. For those with epilepsy, this is excellent news.
The admission to the epilepsy unit lasts about a week, but can be longer in some circumstances. This hospital admission is often memorable and eye opening for patients as they meet other people with epilepsy and share stories with them and their families. They often realize that they are not alone.
Last spring, I joined my daughter Journey's fifth grade class as a volunteer on her field trip. I had the pleasure of watching a classmate approach Journey who was taking photos of a museum exhibit. The classmate suggested she turn off the camera flash; he was concerned that it could trigger one of her seizures. I was overcome with pride and appreciation for the caring, supportive community we have created in partnership with the school administration.
My daughter Journey will not live on a shelf. We may not be able to protect her from every seizure risk and she may incur some injuries now and then, but she will live life fully and share diverse experiences as a result of the collaborative efforts of her family, friends, educational team, and community.
This suggests that simply shifting our language from "epileptic" to "person with epilepsy" can alter the way others think about those living with epilepsy. Employers, colleagues, teachers, and peers may think of their friends differently if we all start referring to "people with epilepsy" instead of "epileptics."
It took two years after being diagnosed with epilepsy for me to reach the point where I wanted to talk about it. Two years of struggling to try and understand what the condition was and how it was going to affect my overall health. Two years of discovering the impact it would have on my everyday life. Two years of being afraid that other people's perception of me was going to be different. The difference in my case was that there were many others, beyond friends and family, who already knew I was dealing with a medical condition. They had seen me experience a seizure before anyone had figured out what it was. There were a lot of questions. I just wasn't prepared to answer them yet.
Epilepsy is a common neurological condition. Chances are you know someone who has the condition. In spite of ongoing public awareness and education programs, many myths still exist. It's time to bust some of those myths today!
Can you imagine suddenly waking up in the middle of the street or at your place of work with no idea how you got there? Can you imagine losing your job or people avoiding you because they're scared of you? These are some of the experiences described to me as a volunteer Administration and Support Co-ordinator at Epilepsy Ottawa.
March is Epilepsy Awareness Month, a time when many people with epilepsy share their story to teach people about it and reach out to others with seizures. I'm glad to be telling my story, but this hasn't always been the case. This time last year, I did not want to talk about having epilepsy. I was filled with anger, frustration, and pain.
We have come a long way in understanding epilepsy since the ancient Greeks' interpretation of a seizure as divine intervention. Even still, while many researchers are studying epilepsy, the public largely misunderstands the condition. Here are five things they believe people should know about epilepsy.