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exports

In 2018, Canada exported $2.7 billion worth of canola seed to China.
“Undoing globalization would be very costly....”
The new year has only just begun, but it's already proving to be another interesting one for Canadian small and medium businesses (SMBs). While economic uncertainty and the changing political landscape are making it difficult to understand the challenges that lie ahead, one thing remains clear: Canadian entrepreneurs who are embracing technology -- and ecommerce, in particular -- are more diversified and feel better equipped to face 2017.
But currency traders could defeat the proposed border tax.
According to the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, innovative SMEs including businesses who export, tend to outperform non-innovators. Today, reaching international markets is vital for continued growth for Canadian entrepreneurs.
We used to be an oil and manufacturing power. What will we be now?
We're #3! We're #3!
In Canada, less than 20 per cent of small and medium businesses (SMBs) have an online retail presence. The reality is that many SMBs are so busy working to keep their businesses running that they have only ever given a brief thought to going online. It's a "nice-to-have," but not a "must-have."
Canada's trade deficit hits record high.
"Where's the growth going to come from?"
We'd be better of with lower oil prices and a lower loonie, CIBC says.
Unemployment and income inequality are issues that are plaguing both countries; so, policies to ameliorate rather than exacerbate them need to be considered. Further research need to be conducted to understand the impact of the TPP on Canada and the U.S. before the trade agreement goes into effect.
China may be inheriting all of the blame for the global market meltdown, but it is just one piece of the puzzle that investors and policymakers alike are trying to figure out in terms of the broader direction of the global economy. Last year, it was Greece's financial woes to blame; now it is China.
Take a gander at the government's economic report cards and one thing becomes readily apparent: an almost virtual absence of inter-provincial comparisons. There's a good reason for that. Compared to Alberta, Ontario and Quebec, B.C. doesn't always stack up so well.
For those not counting, there have been eight B.C. trade missions to China alone in the last 18 months. Forests minister Steve Thomson is set to leave on a ninth mission this Friday. Trade missions aren't cheap, they set the B.C. government back $767,000 in 2014 and that doesn't include the bill for local governments, universities and other agencies.
The bottom line with the Trans-Pacific Partnership for Canada is that it really doesn't have a choice about whether or not to join. The Americans and Mexicans are joining and they're taking the North American market i.e. Canada's market, the source of its prosperity, with them -- whether or not Canada agrees. The TPP will turn North America from a privileged table for three, which Canada has more or less had to share only with Mexico, into a crowded sauve qui peut la vie table for 12.
It's almost as if we're back in the 20th century again: Cars and auto parts have surpassed energy as Canada's biggest export
It was a little alarming to hear the Bank of Canada declare Wednesday that it was “puzzled” by the lack of strength in Canadian
Ever since oil prices began collapsing in the second half of last year, many in Canada have been asking: Can our economy
For years, economists have been saying that if Canada wants sustainable growth, it has to stop relying on consumers taking