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family law

The government agency suddenly ended one program that cost only about $330 a week.
Family stress and events such as separation and divorce can have significantly negative consequences on productivity. And with stress-induced conditions being an important cause of long-term disability claims, it's important that organizations provide tools to empower their employees to deal effectively with these issues.
I practised family law from 1985 to 2009 and was never so relieved in my life as when I finally stopped. From that vantage point, there were things that I was easily able to predict. One of them was that some men would be driven to suicide by the burdens the law thrust upon them.
There are two Ontario statutes to be considered in the family law context of estate administration. The first statute is
It is not simple to resolve conflict within businesses where people bring in different points of view, cultures and values
Prenups don't have to be all one-sided in favour of the family that wants to protect hard-earned assets. I find that bringing fairness and a balanced approach will often allow the young couple to reach a satisfactory agreement.
The way the law works needs to change. As a lawyer, I would much rather help a dozen clients for a few hours each, on an unbundled basis, than spend weeks representing one client in a drawn-out trial. I am confident many of my colleagues feel the same.
The PM's behaviour has provoked concern and anger from MPs and Canadians all over the country. What are the potential legal consequences of the PM's shoving and manhandling? Well, threatening, hitting, kicking, punching, harassing and shoving another person are all offences punishable under the Criminal Code of Canada.
According to a recent study, fully one-third of Canadians will experience a legal problem within any given three-year period. This includes divorcing parents needing child support, small business owners trying to make a living, homeowners facing unscrupulous contractors, hard-working Canadians in conflict with their employers.
With nearly half of all marriages ending in divorce, second marriages and blended families continue to become increasingly common. As a result, estate lawyers are more frequently encountering complex family dynamics and legal issues that involve family law.
Most people will need a lawyer at one point in their lives. Whether it is a home purchase or a will, a bankruptcy or a divorce, lawyers are a necessary part of our society. There are many different layers of client service within that framework, and every client wants to be treated as #1.
When it comes to wills/estates planning, as mentioned, the state of one's intimate relationship(s) becomes critical. Although I promised not to bore you with all of the nuances, I'm going to temporarily break that promise to name a few facts to illustrate my point:
What divorcing spouses and partners don't realize is there are very real consequences of dysfunctional divorce that affect mental, emotional, and developmental well-being and behaviour of children. The effects of divorce trauma become more pronounced the longer a divorce drags on. And two or five years in the life of a child is a huge percentage of time.
Speaking of emails, most lawyers spend a lot of time reading lengthy email missives from their clients, and also multiple strings of nasty emails between client and his or her spouse, many of which will be producible for court. Hard to predict in advance whether you'll need to read a hundred emails or several thousand.
Family law and estate law often function independently. However, when a spouse dies, features of both practice areas quickly become interconnected.
How do you enter into a common-law relationships in the first place and when do various rights vest? For those of you living with a partner or considering doing so (or if you have adult children considering same), I suggest that you grab a cup of coffee, sit down and read the following paragraphs a few of times over.
Today, I launched an advocacy initiative called It's Time For Justice. For 20 years now, we have been talking about improving access to justice in Canada and we have made barely any progress. We need to reduce both the time and costs to get divorced.
The question put to the Ontario Court of Appeal in Carrigan v. Carrigan Estate was whether a current common law spouse, or a separated but legally married spouse, should be entitled to receive a pension death benefit upon the passing of the member of a pension plan.
The shift: divorce and other complicated family dynamics mean closer ties between the two worlds of family law and estate law. As family dynamics shift away from the previous norm of a single traditional marriage and nuclear family, and toward increasing numbers of second and subsequent marriages, blended families, and common law relationships, the need for estate planning becomes a more pressing and complex concern.
Many couples in B.C. who live together were likely shocked to find out they were essentially married Monday morning after