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farmers

In Amherstburg, Wolfhead Distillery offers double barrel whiskey and small-batch vodka, available to sample through tours
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Sweet Surrender It's always a good time for maple syrup and Ontario's Southwest produces lots of it. At Richardson's Farm
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The Canadian government should be receptive to renegotiating NAFTA to include gradual changes to supply management, but this must be done in consultation with Canadian farmers. Having a long-term strategy to increase dairy trade with the U.S., while still protecting Canadian farmers and their livelihoods, is a win-win situation.
Ontario produces more asparagus than the rest of Canada combined, with 90 growers alone in the province; this amounts to 3500 acres worth of asparagus to harvest from. It is a $25 million dollar industry. Due to asparagus farmers investing in this kind of research and breeding, initially, it was a success story. But circumstances quickly changed.
Next week is Local Food Week in Ontario, a celebration of the rich agricultural bounty we're so lucky to have access to in this province. The local food movement has been all the rage for the past few years, and shows no signs of stopping anytime soon. Grocery stores highlight local produce when it's in season, innumerable "farm to table" restaurants have popped up, and farmers markets continue to grow in popularity.
The Chase Fish & Oyster, the more relaxed sister of the upscale Chase fine dining spot, is the latest restaurant to throw their Sunday brunch hat in the proverbial ring. Having just debuted their menu at the end of April, I had a chance to taste a few of the menu items.
Last year, we exported almost $30 million in fresh-cut trees to the United States and another $32.6 million in trees to the rest of the world. When combining the $60+ million that Canadians spent on real trees last year, it all adds up to a $125 million contribution to our rural economy.
The World Health Organization has led the charge to raise awareness and ensure the public understands the looming crisis of what is commonly known as the post-antibiotic era. In essence, we may be forced to return to a world in which these life-saving medicines are no longer effective.
The Alberta NDP provincial government is getting its ass kicked with Bill 6. Nowhere in the Alberta NDP election platform does it mention occupational safety on farms. So where did this major piece of legislation come from? The Alberta NDP is using an obsolete "you elect us, we govern you" style that was already rapidly dying 20 years ago -- a style that became highly ineffective under the information openness of the Internet.
What does it mean to "connect with our food"? There's so much hype and hysteria over this phrase that it's difficult to cultivate an organic experience these days. Not so with the Stratford Chefs League.
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The situation is dire for Asian elephants as there are approximately 30,000 left on the planet with around 23,000 of them in India, and therefore protecting every single Asian elephant is necessary for the long term survival of this endangered species.
Farming is a high stress occupation in which the job merges with personal identity. Relationships quickly become complicated if the job becomes the only focus. Children don't always become farmers. Many leave farm life forever, but some of those who return to the family farm bring innovations in technology and management that help reduce the stress of farming.
Farming is a fairly isolated occupation with a small, close-knit community of co-workers and family. In the small farming community, the saying that everyone knows everything about each other is true. Going to a mental health professional or admitting you are depressed quickly becomes the news. This reduced sense of confidentiality ensures farmers don't talk about their depression.
The question 'would you live by a gas well' is designed to be a 'gotcha' question. The presumption that oil and gas people who obviously understand their own industry best, would therefore never live by an oil and gas well. It is another example of the gross misunderstanding our industry has allowed to perpetuate in Quebec and elsewhere.
One of my earliest memories as a child was going to Prince's Island Park in Calgary every June to walk The World Partnership Walk. Back then, I looked forward to it because we made it a family affair. I would head down to the park with my family and it seemed that in exchange for walking a mere 8 kilometers or so, I would receive a delicious chili lunch, have a chance to part in some fun activities, get my face painted and even come away with a few prizes (it was all well worth the stickers).
If you look around the world at successful dairy farms, they are consistently faced with the issue of competitiveness, which I define as the ability to product a commodity profitably in a sustainable manner year after year. While we have our own challenges in the Canadian dairy sector, we are also fortunate to be working within a system that offers stability and consistency.
In the last several years I have become more and more aware of how disconnected the average consumer is from agriculture. Most people are now living in urban centres and have no connection to the farm. This stranger was a perfect example of this. He had many questions and many misconceptions about modern agriculture.
Are you weary? Of always "doing"......often with little to show for all your hard work? Do you just want to stop sometimes? Let the chips fall where they may. Or the mismatched socks at least. Yeah, me too. I get weary. See, I come from farmer stock. Farmers always look towards the harvest. It can be long, hard work. A few truths in relation to harvesting;
The irregular weather conditions most of Ontario has been experiencing over the past few months have set the province up for a particularly challenging harvest season. Some of the farms we talked to were not even sure if they would be opening to the public this season because it has been such a hard year. So what does this mean for Ontario? As a result of this spring and summer's hectic weather, experts are expecting to see food prices rise by 4 per cent across Canada in 2013.