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farmers

In Amherstburg, Wolfhead Distillery offers double barrel whiskey and small-batch vodka, available to sample through tours
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Sweet Surrender It's always a good time for maple syrup and Ontario's Southwest produces lots of it. At Richardson's Farm
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The Canadian government should be receptive to renegotiating NAFTA to include gradual changes to supply management, but this must be done in consultation with Canadian farmers. Having a long-term strategy to increase dairy trade with the U.S., while still protecting Canadian farmers and their livelihoods, is a win-win situation.
Ontario produces more asparagus than the rest of Canada combined, with 90 growers alone in the province; this amounts to 3500 acres worth of asparagus to harvest from. It is a $25 million dollar industry. Due to asparagus farmers investing in this kind of research and breeding, initially, it was a success story. But circumstances quickly changed.
Next week is Local Food Week in Ontario, a celebration of the rich agricultural bounty we're so lucky to have access to in this province. The local food movement has been all the rage for the past few years, and shows no signs of stopping anytime soon. Grocery stores highlight local produce when it's in season, innumerable "farm to table" restaurants have popped up, and farmers markets continue to grow in popularity.
The Chase Fish & Oyster, the more relaxed sister of the upscale Chase fine dining spot, is the latest restaurant to throw their Sunday brunch hat in the proverbial ring. Having just debuted their menu at the end of April, I had a chance to taste a few of the menu items.
Last year, we exported almost $30 million in fresh-cut trees to the United States and another $32.6 million in trees to the rest of the world. When combining the $60+ million that Canadians spent on real trees last year, it all adds up to a $125 million contribution to our rural economy.
The World Health Organization has led the charge to raise awareness and ensure the public understands the looming crisis of what is commonly known as the post-antibiotic era. In essence, we may be forced to return to a world in which these life-saving medicines are no longer effective.
The Alberta NDP provincial government is getting its ass kicked with Bill 6. Nowhere in the Alberta NDP election platform does it mention occupational safety on farms. So where did this major piece of legislation come from? The Alberta NDP is using an obsolete "you elect us, we govern you" style that was already rapidly dying 20 years ago -- a style that became highly ineffective under the information openness of the Internet.
What does it mean to "connect with our food"? There's so much hype and hysteria over this phrase that it's difficult to cultivate an organic experience these days. Not so with the Stratford Chefs League.