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Finance Minister Jim Flaherty

Financial knowledge is at the heart of stretching our dollars. For those with a severe and prolonged disability, saving money can be particularly challenging, given the expenses that often accompany disabilities and, in some cases, the difficulties getting or holding a job. And if you are tending to a loved one with a disability, extra costs likely are involved.
Sharply dropping oil prices and a weakened Canadian energy sector are revealing the limited, ineffectual nature of Stephen Harper's economic policies. Those policies, focused almost exclusively on that one sector, are too narrow. They have rendered Canadians more vulnerable and less resilient. And his government seems out of gas. Unable to cope with adverse economic developments, Mr. Harper is now retreating to a bunker. Instead of reaching out to Canadians to show leadership and build confidence, he has punted the federal budget, normally delivered in February or March, into April or later. That means Canada will go without a budget for more than this entire fiscal year.
In a 40-page opinion released last week, B.C. Conflict of Interest Commissioner Paul Fraser pretty well cleared former Agriculture Minister Pat Pimm of any wrongdoing with respect to his obligations under the Members' Conflict of Interest Act, despite the odd "tsk, tsk" here and there.
Flaherty, who was only 64 when he died, was devoted to his family and one of the most popular Members of Parliament. And while his life achievements and humanity should be praised, it also needs to be said that during his time in the federal government his policies severely discriminated against the vast majority of Canadians. With apologies to Clint Eastwood, the Flaherty/Harper contributions to the economic life of the country can be broken into three main areas: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.
As one of the longest serving Finance Ministers, he introduced such initiatives such as the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, the Building Canada Plan and cut the GST. He also took a leadership role in G7 and G20 leaders gatherings and showed smarts at the beginning of the financial meltdown of 2008. He was respected at home and abroad whether one agreed with him or not.
Jim Flaherty, who passed away suddenly Thursday at 64, will go down in Canadian history books as one of the longest-standing
Former finance minister Jim Flaherty has died at the age of 64. Flaherty, one of Canada's longest-serving finance ministers
Joe Oliver, Canada's new federal Minister of Finance, made quite a name for himself during his tenure as Minister of Natural Resources. With Oliver moving to the helm of the country's finances, perhaps it's time to take a look back over his notable career. Is Oliver's selective use (and misuse) of the facts restricted to the oilsands?
While some might debateJim Flaherty's legacy as finance minister, his old family friends Rob and Doug Ford are definitely
Jim Flaherty's colleagues were quick to post tributes to the Tory MP after he announced his resignation as finance minister