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finding happiness

Whether it's the weather, trouble at work or a broken heart, if you are dragging yourself through the day like a little slug of sadness we've got nine ways to improve your mood that are free, easy and involve chocolate and hugs.
We don't spend enough time doing the things that bring us joy. This hit home for me many months ago when someone asked me what I did for fun. Because I love what I do, I immediately referenced my job. However, I struggled to answer the next question: "What do you do when you're not working?"
By the time we're in our thirties we've subconsciously conditioned ourselves to have automatic responses to stress: "I'm too tired," "I can't help myself," or "things never work out for me." These myths can lower the bar and prolong a rut you may find yourself in, making meh the new normal.
Life was good. Until it wasn't. Because something that I can only refer to as stroke-like symptoms started to take over me, seemingly out of nowhere. A Mumford & Son's song blared in the background (I had just come home from a month long tour across the southern U.S. with them,) as I started to lose feeling in the left side of my body. First in my hand, palm and up my arm, then in my foot, calf, thigh and entire left leg. I wanted to tell my guy that something was happening to me, but I struggled to get any tangible words out of my mouth.
When was the last time you were bursting with joy? Can you think of moments when the entire world around you can stop right
In addition to being among the healthiest worker bees, commuters who cycle to work are also the happiest, according to a
There is one inalienable truth about happiness. Grumpy old men, and women, are not grumpy whatsoever -- contrary to popular myth. In fact, this truth remains the most contrarian of all research on happiness, and, to the best of my knowledge, is still the most evidence-based.
According to estimates, the beauty market is worth some $59.8 billion in the U.S., with the average woman spending roughly
Robin Wiszowaty left the gleaming strip malls, street grids and coiffed lawns of suburban Illinois for the wilds of rural Kenya in 2002. And she's never looked back. What was meant to be a brief exchange from the University of Illinois to the small Nkoyet-naiborr community in Kenya's Maasai Mara has morphed into her life's adventure. Here, Robin Wiszowaty tells us how she fell in sync with the heartbeat of Africa, and how she found her home.
A recent report has suggested that family "fun" is anything but, indicating that finding personal happiness through the act