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fiscal responsibility

After a crushing defeat in 2015, the Conservatives sought to find a leader who could do what Stephen Harper could not; bring new voters especially millennials to the party, appeal to minorities and immigrants, and present a more moderate platform than the one Harper employed for his campaign.
Nobody likes to pay taxes. However, the pill is easier to swallow when everyone pays their fair share. It's increasingly clear that in Canada -- and in most industrialized countries -- many are not. We have a two-tier system where the wealthy and the corporations can escape their obligations, and the rest of us can't.
With Canada's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) actually shrinking and despite having the worst economic growth record of any Prime Minister since R.B. Bennett, Stephen Harper seems keen to brag about the fiscal reputation of his Conservative Party. Well, let's take a close look. To begin with, here's an interesting question: How many Conservative Prime Ministers in all of the 20th century presented Canada with balanced budgets?
Today I am announcing the launch of the Walter Scott Centre, a Saskatchewan focused think tank named after our first premier.
The Liberal policy convention will bring together a wide range of dedicated Canadians determined to address constructively Canada's long-term potential and challenges. I am looking forward to many refreshing debates and discussions, with or without any childish and petty Conservative shenanigans.
Fiscal responsibility has been the hallmark of the Harper government from day one. It's therefore quite interesting to see in year seven of his reign that the opposition is focused on trying to destroy the credibility the Tories have on that front. It's a good strategy on their part, enabled by some help from the government side.