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foreign affairs

Governments should not be conducting sensitive diplomatic negotiations or applying pressures via these platforms.
The challenge for Canadian foreign policy is to mitigate the risks of the rebels faltering in Aleppo, with the more long-term strategic challenge of Russia and Iran's vicious play for power. Should Aleppo fall, an even more dystopian region will emerge.
More than half of the world's child deaths occur in fragile places like South Sudan and Afghanistan. Yet Canada only commits 25 per cent of its official development budget to these areas. To go the distance to reach the world's most vulnerable people, the figure needs to change.
The term reportedly angers the so-called Islamic State.
Christine Lagarde will now be facing a trial in France for "negligence" after allowing a compensation payment of close to US$600 million to a French politician and businessman. Canadians would not accept that a politician, being tried for something like this, remain in power while the trial was going on.
We have to recognize that, as a rising super power, China does not always have to do what Canada wants it to do. Our press has to stop getting into the habit of being self-indulgent or exhibiting a moral superiority complex.
The United Nations created 17 Sustainable Development Goals, or Global Goals, in September 2015 for corporations and countries to guide them toward inclusive and sustainable societies. Undeniably, these global goals appeared optimistic and, for some, bordered on the impossible.
"Responsible conviction" is a strange combination of words that summarizes the guiding principle that the new Foreign Affairs Minister Stéphane Dion is proposing to follow in order to fulfill his mandate. However, Mr. Dion didn't say a word on how the "responsible conviction" can help cases of Canadians detained abroad.
Questions about the dubious eligibility of Saudi Arabia as a recipient of Canadian-made military equipment have been raised for over two years. Yet two successive governments have failed to address the most basic question: how can the authorization of this deal be consistent with the human-rights safeguards of Canadian export controls?
Openness and transparency permeates the mandate letters issued to members of cabinet by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and is a recurring theme in statements by his government. In fact, it is the only theme next to climate change so far. But what does openness mean for development assistance?
"It was not part of my dream to become minister of foreign affairs, but now that I have the responsibility, I am ecstatic with it.”
The man dubbed "not a leader" has been named Canada's foreign affairs minister. It's one of the most coveted and prestigious roles in government. Dion will now get the chance to represent Canada on the world stage, a prospect that might have seemed impossible back when the death of the Liberal party was being exaggerated.
International relations with Iran suffered under Stephen Harper. There's a noteworthy Iranian-Canadian community scattered across Canada, which has nurtured prominent artists, scientists, scholars, business people, entrepreneurs, journalists and even politicians who maintain close relations with the fellow citizens living in Iran. Now, as the Liberal government of Justin Trudeau is soon to be inaugurated, Iranians living in Canada and their compatriots at home are wishing for a quick and immediate normalization of the relations between Tehran and Ottawa.
The world is littered with women and men who feed on the misery of entire societies, who have grown fat in their spoils and comfortable in their impunity, sheltering behind national jurisdictions and national institutions they have been able to twist to their benefit. But there is a higher law. There is a deeper justice. And we will stand up for it.
The absence of female voices in public policy debates is not simply a matter of demographic representation. Without women's voices, and more specifically feminist voices, we lose the perspective that strong women bring to the table and we lose the potential for far better politics and policies that champion the rights and interests of both women and men.
Stephen Harper's decisions on Iran, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine and the United States have officially shut the last nails on the coffin of Canadian relevance in global governance. The Conservative government's hard power strategy officially commits Canada to the role of a fireman in an incandescent region, at the taxpayer's expense, with zero influence on the regional levers at the core of the Middle East's most pressing fires today. It is time for the opposition parties to fine-tune their foreign policy chops in the coming official campaign period in order for Canada to chart its way back to the world's bargaining table.
The human rights-interfaith dialogue rhetoric employed by President Obama on May 22, 2015 at the Adas Israel Synagogue in Washington DC was wonderful and made people feel warm inside. But this type of rhetoric is, in fact, messianic -- it is for tomorrow, for a time when there is no more war. That day has not yet come, I am afraid. And to speak as if it has is very dangerous.
This past week I was invited to speak as an expert at the United Nations Informal Meeting of Experts under the auspices of
Martin Gary Atwood was found dead on a resort beach earlier this month.
That means the ministry can post almost anything it wants. His ministry is now using BuzzFeed lists to slam its enemies. So