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funding

Our current government has been staking much on an "innovation economy." So how do we get there?
Charities are failing to attract and engage younger donors in any significant way.
Nothing is harder than being an entrepreneur: self-sacrifice, countless hours, true diligence and undying commitment. I interviewed the following accomplished entrepreneurs, who excel at what they do and have been handpicked by the media as ones to watch. Here, they reflect on their past mistakes and share some of their insights with their B2B counterparts when it comes to e-commerce, IT, funding, delegation, sales and scaling too fast.
Many in venture capital preach the gospel of raising equity, saying that a small piece of a large pie is better than a large piece of a small pie. This is often self-serving. Although sometimes raising equity makes sense, entrepreneurs are too often on the side of parting ways with equity too easily, so that isn't the best advice.
Canada's humane societies and SPCAs have been telling their own individual stories since the 1800s, but we haven't had the chance to tell the collective, Canadian story until now. A new, first-of-its-kind sector report just released by the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies gives us that bigger picture view.
A First Nations police force, the Nishnawbe Aski Police Service (NAPS), who serves and protects 35 northern Ontario communities is voting to strike because they do not have access to the basics that law enforcement should have and it is putting officers in high-risk "nightmarish" situations.
Should York University accept funding that is contingent upon agreeing to remove a controversial piece of art? Without the ability to explore and express ideas that are troubling and even transgressive, universities would become mills that deliver pre-approved doses of information in community sanctioned packets.
Pre-seed, a relatively new stage in the funding process, is becoming more recognized in the Canadian startup ecosystem and in other startup hubs around the world. The trend is growing for a number of reasons, and Canada would benefit from more capital dedicated to pre-seed from truly value-added investors.
If you are one of those start-ups be prepared for a rigorous process. If you are competing for funding from an angel investor group or in a business competition you are going to have to go through a lot of hoops. Don't despair, this will actually help you prepare for running the business itself.
The CBC is facing significant challenges. There is the continued rise of the Internet and digital services like Netflix that are changing the broadcasting landscape. More and more content is consumed online. There are also long-standing challenges of competing against the U.S. entertainment giant to our south. With these challenges in mind, here is what I propose. It is important to have a strong and vibrant CBC, to tell our stories, to entertain and inform us as Canadians.
The Conservative budget's failure to initiate a process of comprehensive tax reform is a missed opportunity to lift Canada's prospects for long-term prosperity and growth. Tax reform and simplification would improve Canada's international competitiveness, productivity and economic growth, from both a personal and corporate perspective.
The ongoing strikes at York University and the University of Toronto have prompted a variety of thoughtful and insightful examinations of the state of university education in Ontario. In particular, the conversation around the changing nature of academic work and the plight of contract faculty is essential to the future of our universities. Unfortunately, an incorrect -- and harmful -- idea has crept into some of the recent coverage: that the relatively good working conditions of full-timers are to blame for the frankly awful conditions of those working on contract.
Does CBC/Radio-Canada need saving? While some have been sounding the alarm for a while now, there is a perfectly viable way for the CBC to keep on operating even if the money it gets from Ottawa keeps on shrinking: direct funding from viewers, a model that works very well south of the border.
Any delay in the Commissioner's office means information requesters will have to wait even longer to get their documents. It also means that if the government digs in its heels, requesters can't even get their day in Federal Court until the Commissioner's office finishes its review of the file.
Anyone in the not-for-profit sector knows that things don't always go according to plan. Sometimes you're scrambling for funding, and other times (if you're fortunate), you have a lot of freedom to implement new programs. If you've missed a milestone, don't fixate on it. Instead, find ways to adapt and realign your strategy.
First, we need to learn from the best health regions across the country how to monitor hospital stays (length and quality), guarantee access to family doctors for the poor, and make sure family physicians make up a reasonable proportion of the physician workforce.
Money shouldn't dictate your success or potential. While it may be more difficult without funding to bring your idea to reality, it doesn't mean it can't be done.In fact in some ways it can be a blessing in disguise. Your passion will be put to the test, your vision will be challenged and with each roadblock your determination will strengthen as your vision grows.
This past week, I learned that a residential treatment program for youth (aka group home) in Welland, Ontario will be shutting its doors permanently at the end of November. Outside of my personal history growing up in group homes, this signals a much wider (and troublesome) trend in the world of child and youth workers.
As I understand it, Harper's plan is to place someone on the CBC's board to monitor and participate in labour negotiations on behalf of the government is different than having a government representative in the newsroom vetting stories. Harper's plans should definitely be thwarted but that is, ultimately, only a tiny step toward actually fixing the CBC.
While it took a few years after the financial crisis for financial services start-ups to get their business models refined to the point where they can come to market they are here now, and these alternative financial services technology companies are becoming viable and increasingly common sources of financing for entrepreneurs and small businesses.