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gaming

Nintendo has become a bipolar brand; a pop cultural pendulum swinging between extreme highs and intense lows. Now in the wake of their failed Wii U console, they're launching the innovative console-meets-handheld Nintendo Switch in hopes of a much-needed 1Up.
The recent release of Pokémon Go, the mobile phone augmented reality game, has taken the world by storm. The game has become a fitness icon, requiring players to walk or run around in the real world to catch Pokémon creatures in their virtual world.
Pokémon GO has brought together people of all ages and demographics in the pursuit of one common goal: catching Pokémon. The game rewards users for being sociable (clustering together where other users can be found), and people who wouldn't have ever conversed before are now engaging in dialogues. Yes, Pokémon GO has people once again talking to one another.
As a tool, Pokemon Go has changed my life. It's such a simple tool (and let's face it, not a great app or game as it crashes constantly and is riddled with server issues) but it's vastly improved my mental and physical health in the two weeks I have been using it.
Don't call "Pokémon GO" a comeback, Pikachu's been here for years. Twenty years, to be exact, an anniversary celebrated this past February. The viral launch of the augmented reality game on smartphones on July 6 has pushed this enduring Japanese pop cultural property into a previously unexplored region: the real world.
Menstruation is one of the leading causes of absenteeism among adolescent girls, with girls in Kenya missing an average of four days each month. Without access to accurate and essential health information, girls have limited understanding of how their bodies work. Femme International's study in Nairobi showed that 80 per cent of girls had no idea what menstruation was before their first period, leading to feelings of fear, confusion, and shame. A new smartphone game aims to change that.
More damsels on screen and in the code will reduce gaming's distress.
The Global Positioning System, more commonly known by the abbreviation GPS, is much more than a simple map tool for driving. While using GPS satellite navigation can help save time and gas money on long car trips, GPS applications go far beyond travel to areas such as farming, animal tracking, and even gaming.