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gender parity

For the longest time, a photo of the premiers assembled could be mistaken for a photo of a fraternity or a really unsuccessful boy band.
Think it doesn't exist? Yes. It. Does.
Across capital markets, 40 stock exchanges will be ringing in International Women's Day as part of the Sustainable Stock Exchanges initiative. The opening bell, which ceremoniously signals commencement of trading activity for the day, will also ring out for "the pivotal role the private sector can play in advancing gender equality to achieve the UN's SDG 5."
"There is no better time for Canada to demonstrate its commitment to advancing women's rights."
This past summer, I covered the 7th G(irls)20 Summit. As the Official Global Correspondent I learnt about the G20 and how it operates. I worked with high potential young women from around the world to develop and formulate a detailed communiqué, which was presented to G20 Leaders before they met in China.
In a corporate setting, it's surprising that gender parity forecasts continue to be so dismal when more studies are finding that diverse companies outperform businesses that aren't as inclusive. So why is this the case? And what does it have to do with changing a couple gender-specific words in the national anthem? The answer has to do with a term called "unconscious or implicit bias."
While conditions can vary, we define flexible workplaces as organizations that allow employees a measure of control over when, where and how they work, including working part-time, working from home, setting their own hours and taking leaves of absence. Employees are increasingly seeking flexibility. For women, workplace flexibility is especially important.
These next few days are like festival season for political people: in Winnipeg the Liberal Party is gathering for the 2016 Biennial Convention while over in Vancouver, the Conservative Party are also in the midst of their national convention. Gender equity and increasing the number of female candidates will be a hot topic for both. PM Trudeau and his core team have this made this a clear priority for this Liberal Party and for the Conservatives, a more gender inclusive party has to be an essential part of their renewal efforts.
At the provincial level, three provinces are led by women, including Premier Rachel Notley in Alberta. Women make up 53 per cent of our province's cabinet ministers. In 2006, it was a mere 11 per cent. So, in a decade, that's progress. Federally, as in Alberta, cabinet is gender-balanced, a move that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau justified with the now oft-quoted "because it's 2015." Yet, in 2016, it must be noted that only 26 per cent of seats in the House of Commons are held by women. So, why is it that the lack of gender parity remains so pronounced in most levels of government across Canada?
"Before it could be 2015, it had to be 2014 and 2013 and 2012."
2133 is when the World Economic Forum is predicting global gender parity. And it's back to the future on wages. Only now in 2016 are women earning the amount men did in 2006. Despite the gloomy prediction and statistic, I believe the gender gap can and will be closed within my lifetime.
Both Prime Minister Trudeau and President Obama are at a unique moment in their political careers -- one that lends itself to bold initiatives: an investment in a shared conversation and strategy to shift the frame on gender, care, equality and parenting in the next generation of boys would be groundbreaking. When that generation of men come of age, it would have a transformative ripple effect on families, workplaces, public spaces and relationships.
In honour of International Women's Day!
The Liberals had promised a new, government-wide appointment process that is open and based on merit. They recently reaffirmed that promise and added that they will ensure gender parity and that indigenous peoples and minority groups are reflected in positions of leadership. Nobody yet knows what this new government-wide process will look like.
From a talent acquisition and recruitment point of view, one thing is quite clear: Justin Trudeau is off to a good start. Over the more than quarter century that I've been vetting and recommending candidates for leadership roles in global companies, I've learned that actions indeed speak louder than words, symbolism matters, diverse points of view should be promoted, and a strong team trumps a strong individual all the time.
I do not recall anyone questioning the merits of male ministers being appointed as the vast majority of cabinets -- forever. Were all those stellar choices under Stephen Harper (Julian Fantino, Vic Toews, and Pierre Poilievre to name a few) just so unquestionably well-prepared for the job that the matter never came up? Or is it beyond obvious that questions of merit never surfaced when the expected men were put in their usual spots -- known as positions of power?
"There are meritorious MPs of all shades, genders and orientations."
The difference between how much women and men are paid in Canada isn't just a large amount — it’s actually a life-changing