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George Bush

Bush had a long record of public service, from the Navy to Congress to the United Nations to the CIA to the Oval Office.
We like to think of both Canada and the U.S. as representative democracies, but these days that seems like a distant goal.
Dear Steve: Ordinarily, I'm not in the habit of writing to sitting prime ministers. But even I have to pause and wonder what the heck is going on with your gang up there in Ottawa these days. Have you all been starting cocktail hour at lunchtime or smoking all that excess B.C. bud confiscated by the RCMP?
For most Millennials, life thus far is divided into two distinct components: pre-9/11 and post-9/11. At the dividing line lies the first news report on the radio or the phone call in which the person on the other end said, "Turn on the TV." 9/11 forced us to grow up overnight, and growing up was not all that it's cracked up to be.
TORONTO -- Liberal prime minister Jean Chrétien's decision to break with U.S. President George W. Bush on the 2003 invasion
The greatest argument against launching a war to overthrow Saddam Hussein was what would come after him. The war hawks downplayed the costs of invading Iraq by claiming that there would be no need for a long-term U.S. troop presence, and certainly not as large as Army leaders had estimated.
News that four former Guantanamo detainees have filed a complaint against Canada with the UN Committee Against Torture for the Canadian government's failure to arrest George W. Bush has caused quite a tempest in our teapot. Evidence of Bush's involvement in authorizing war crimes and torture goes far beyond the reasonable grounds necessary for law enforcement.
It's no secret Mitt Romney's campaign has wanted to keep George W. Bush out of the spotlight, but sending him to hide on
After decades of mistaken policy with the Middle East, the U.S. should do what's necessary to prevent Iran from becoming a nuclear power, and get rid of Assad and his sycophancy to Tehran. America has a very poor track record with the Middle East, and will simply, eventually, have to do better than this.
At least no one will be able to claim that the U.S. has suffered a military defeat. But it has suffered a period of extended strategic incapacity, which has fanned defeatism and exaggerated notions of imminent loss of world leadership.
What happens now that a weary world is pulling up its military stakes in Afghanistan? Some worry that the gains women have made will be traded for a so-called peace with the fundamentalists. Don't believe it -- the women are poised to yank this primitive place into the 21st century. They are the reformers and they won't go home again.
If the occupiers want to be more than an evanescent magic carpet for a gaggle of hacks, gasbags, and kooks, they will have to produce a leadership worthy of being taken seriously and make alliances with other dissenters.