HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

girls education

They were both home to watch their son's first steps, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said.
She talked about the importance of educating girls.
We need to understand that representation matters, and girls of any shape, size, and personality can be successful in STEM fields.
Today's business landscape is constantly evolving. Despite this rapid evolution, however, it can still sometimes feel as though the changes we desire are not happening fast enough. These feelings are especially true when considering topics like career progression and, most recently, women's leadership.
When the news broke that President Trump's administration might be ending the Let Girls Learn initiative -- a program that provides educational resources and tools to adolescent girls in underdeveloped countries -- there was an immediate outcry on social media. What reason could there be to end such an inarguably positive initiative?
On Wednesday, April 12, Prime Minister Trudeau will present that citizenship to Malala Yousafzai. For young women across our country, it will be a moment of pride and hope. Her fearless stand is something Canada applauds. But recognizing her passion is not all Canada is doing to improve the lives of girls around the world.
Some people hate being in a plane for a long period of time, but I love it: it means you're off to a faraway destination. When I booked my 15-hour direct flight to India to attend a wedding, I was excited. The long flight also meant I would have enough time to watch at least five Bollywood movies.
We can do better for our girls.
"It makes these girls feel like they have no future, no hope and there's really no point getting an education."
Thursday is International Literacy Day, a chance to celebrate the power of reading in children's lives. If you're a book-lover yourself, you may remember curling up with your latest childhood treasure (it was Anne of Green Gables for me!)
As a teacher, my dad has worked hard to instill in me a love of language and learning. Now, as a writer and editor with World Vision, I get to hear lots of stories of dads who, like mine did, are building a foundation for their children's futures. The reality is though, that my father has had more opportunities in life than the dads we meet with World Vision. And there's no better time to highlight those dads than on Father's Day.
"Canada truly understands that gender equality and gender empowerment is a priority."
In our constantly powered world, it's easy to forget what access to electricity means in terms of basic sustenance, safety and health. When the power is out, Sierra Leoneans in need of blood transfers in Sierra are usually transferred to other hospitals -- and often die along the way.
Meet Marie Jeanne and Martha. Marie Jeanne and her six siblings were raised by their single mother. Martha comes from a family
Nearly 90 per cent of girls tell Plan International that they have more opportunities in life than their mothers did. That's progress. But in developing countries, girls are twice as likely as boys to suffer malnutrition, and 63 million girls (many more than boys) don't attend school. Removing barriers to education, health care and other rights isn't enough. We need to focus on how girls can move beyond merely surviving, to thriving.
Women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. The underlying reasons for this gender imbalance are complex but research suggests gender stereotyping from the earliest age impacts the enrollment of women in STEM.
In Africa, Ebola and women's rights are not unrelated. As Bertha, one of the young women in the book, says: "When you educate a girl, everything changes." Everything. Among the many ugly lessons from the Ebola zone is the cost of poor primary health care, and how it is directly correlated to female literacy. We know better. From Vietnam to Jordan to Ghana, we know that frontline health care improves when women are involved. Better still if they are in charge, as professionally trained workers, and educated mothers with freedom to make health care decisions for their families.
When the students at Kisaruni All-Girls Secondary School in rural Kenya had the opportunity to set their school hours, they pushed the limits. The girls begin their studies each morning at 4:45 a.m. and end at 10 p.m., with classroom instruction from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The grumbling resentment toward schoolwork that typifies the North American high-school experience seemed, well, positively lame, compared to the Kenyan girls' fierce dedication to learning.
Africa's 600 million hectares of uncultivated land -- more than half the global total -- adds up to a recipe for a better food future. Agricultural innovation, education, and the resulting empowerment of women and girls promises to make the coming population boom a turning point toward truly sustainable development.
It is widely acknowledged that Japan needs more females in business to make up for a shrinking workforce and to boost economic growth and opportunity. With this admirable goal in mind, we must work to make Japan a nation where every individual, male and female, has equal opportunities to realize their full social, economic and political potential. As a Japanese youth, I am not afraid to break from traditional practices and defy what is expected of me. I am ready to pursue my own dream to become a fearsome business leader and 2014 G(irls)20 Delegate representing Japan.