HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

global issues

For decades, Joseph Kony was infamous in human rights circles. But he became a household name after the short film Kony 2012 called for an international effort to bring the Ugandan warlord to justice. Five years later, the U.S. and Ugandan militaries are calling off the hunt. Kony remains at large.
The Netflix series "13 Reasons Why" has sparked an international controversy for its depiction of teen suicide. But the hit drama has become a scapegoat for an entire industry that, experts say, could do better in its depictions of mental illness.
What will your child be when they grow up? Maybe a quantum automotive programmer, or a multi-phasic data sculptor. OK, we made those jobs up. But consider this: just ten years ago, 'social media manager' or 'mobile app developer' would have seemed like imaginary job titles to most.
As human-caused climate change continues to warm the planet, sea levels will rise, storms will grow stronger, floods more violent and draughts harsher. All of this puts some of the world's most vulnerable people at greater risk.
Your kid is holed up in the basement, alone in the dark except for the glowing screen and the alien invaders from their favourite video game. Again. Don't worry; an alternative to space war is on the way.
This Earth Day, thousands of scientists will descend on Washington DC to protest budget cuts to their departments. The science seems to suggest that when people in lab coats align with one political side, they only drive people further away. Instead, scientists need to stoke our wonder.
Canadians can help make their communities resilient. Get together with your neighbours and make a community emergency plan. Identify the most vulnerable in your neighbourhood -- seniors living alone, large families with young children -- and create a volunteer network to check up on them when extreme weather strikes. If you own a business, consider how you could help out--for example, a restaurant might prepare meals for residents stranded in emergency shelters.
Conventional wisdom in advertising says steer clear of politics. But at the Super Bowl, the Holy Grail of advertising, brands broke the rules. Companies represent 58 per cent of the largest economic entities in the world, with tremendous resources to grow and scale. When they invest meaningfully in causes, marrying profit and purpose, they make sales and social impact.
Tyler and Alex Mifflin spent summers in the water. Childhood memories of canoe trips and pristine waves contrast heavily with something they heard from adults time and again: "Don't swim in Lake Ontario. It's too polluted." That warning was the first drop in the bucket that's become a shared life goal. March 22 is World Water Day and we need the conversation to extend beyond the environment. So we spoke with the Mifflin brothers about the importance of water and how ordinary people can take action every day in unexpected ways.
Sadly, women still march in the streets for the same fundamental rights men take for granted. In developing communities especially, huge gaps remain in areas like women's education, health and economic opportunity. Overlooking men can actually worsen inequality, according to a 2013 World Bank study that examined two decades of research on gender equity programs.
The Internet was meant to be this great contest of ideas. But instead of expanding our perspectives, the Internet shows us what it thinks we want to see. Is it also dividing us?
Growing up, there was an unspoken absence in Zainib Abdullah's life. In Richmond Hill, Ontario, far from the home her family left in Iraq, she pieced together the story of her uncle. He had been unjustly arrested and disappeared years earlier by Saddam Hussein's government, without a trial or a chance to say goodbye to his loved ones. Now she puts pen to paper, writing letters on behalf of people unfairly imprisoned around the world.
Kids connect with characters who look like them, even if those characters are sidelined. But during playtime, your kid is the casting director. A toy they can identify with makes them the hero of their own story, and could overcome what we call 'activist's block,' the self-diminishing excuse we hear often: "I'm just one person. What can I do?"
Professor Jeremy Bailenson has been researching the neurological and psychological impact of virtual reality for 15 years at Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab. Visual, auditory and dynamic spatial cues mimic real-life responses in the brain; he's found that the immersive quality of this technology leaves an indelible mark on users in a way that still images don't.
Food demands on our planet will double by 2050, when the population is set to reach 9.7 billion. With the global dinner table getting crowded, and the planet running out of arable land, it's going to take some extreme gardening to keep everyone fed. These breakthroughs could herald the future of food production.
The Rio Olympics have now come to a close, but here's a satirical spectator sport for those of us who were frustrated by the nightly highlight reels belittling female athletes. It's called "Olympic media sexism bingo." Comedian Megan Ford posted the game card on her Twitter account.
From Asia to South America, insects have long appeared on the menu in many cultures. But what's truly epic about the edible bug trend is its potential to not only provide a healthy source of food, but also boost incomes among people in developing countries who could never afford chicken or beef from a grocery store.
International law has decreed that denying civilians access to the basic necessities of life is a war crime. Yet according to experts we spoke with, there is still too little global awareness and action to protect vital water resources in war zones.
It's hard to match the image of wanton recklessness with the soft-spoken, thoughtful 18-year-old Lucas we talked to recently. He has transformed, thanks to a service learning program that's teaching young convicts -- including hardened gang members -- about global issues, social justice and community activism.
The conflict in Syria remains the deadliest in the world today, with almost 70,000 killed since the start of 2015. However, it's not the only war costing thousands of lives. Entering its second year, Yemen's civil war has seen more than 8,000 civilian casualties.