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glyphosate

A combination of propaganda disseminated by industry front groups and conflicts of interest effectively allow dangerous chemicals and GMOs into the food chain and serve to keep the public in the dark about what is taking place and the impacts on their health. Certain individuals, like journalist Rosemary Mason, are working to shine a light on this.
the focus of this blog is how glyphosate may damage our metabolisms, causing many of us to gain weight. In essence, it is said to destroy the "beneficial" bacteria in our intestines, which is the kind of bacteria that helps us properly digest food and burn calories more efficiently.
The good news is that citizen scientists and backyard butterfly lovers from across the northeastern U.S. and southern Canada have reported through social media that monarch butterflies are arriving and laying a remarkable number of eggs. But it's too early to gauge whether the numbers will meet already low expectations.
In the mid-1990s, the eastern monarch population was more than one billion. In winter 2013, the population had dropped by more than 95 per cent to 35 million, with a modest increase to 56.5 million this past winter. Much of the monarch butterfly decline has been pinned on the virtual eradication of its critical food source milkweed.
This is not very good PR for agricultural company Monsanto. While being filmed by French cable channel Canal+, GMO advocate
This is not very good PR for agricultural company Monsanto. While being filmed by French cable channel Canal+, GMO advocate
Monarch butterflies are in trouble, their numbers drastically reduced. Experts and others are calling on citizen scientists -- and politicians -- to help. We can only hope our leaders live up to their commitment,. But we can also become citizen scientists to help monarchs survive.