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Great Recession

Those who went to work during the Great Recession earn have had it tougher than those before or after, a new study finds.
New Brunswick, ranked in 2014 by the Conference Board of Canada as one of the worst provincial (GDP) performing economies in the world, can not seem to shake off decade-after-decade of economic mismanagement.
Another chart doesn't.
Politics aside, the concept behind infrastructure spending in theory makes sense: with interest rates near all-time lows and little expectation of them going up in the short term, now is probably as a good a time as any to borrow money and put it to work.
While a Canadian dollar spent might only get you 70 cents (or less) of a U.S. stock, that stock's potential return over the long haul will likely more than offset its higher sticker price -- not to mention help you diversify your portfolio out of Canadian-only investments.
Since debt became super cheap after the Great Recession, we all have taken on a ton of of it. Nationally we have an average of $27,000 in non-mortgage debt -- and $190,000 in mortgage debt. Here is how we all can get rid of our debt in 10 years so we can enjoy our retirements and our lives debt-free.
Canadians are stuck with $158-billion in new Harper debt -- without much to show for it. There are 160,000 more jobless Canadians today than before Stephen Harper took power. Job quality is at a 25-year low. Household debt is near a record high. Canada's trade deficit this year has topped $13-billion. The Liberal legacy was a decade of balanced budgets, average annual economic growth over three per cent, consistent trade surpluses every month of every year, 3.4-million net new jobs, lower debt, lower taxes, record high Transfer Payments to the provinces. That's what Mr. Harper inherited in 2006. But Mr. Harper blew it.
Six years beyond the onset of global crisis and the lamentation seems louder: pundits are increasingly perplexed by the planet's prolonged period of perpetual perturbations. So, does anything stand out in 2014 as an "out of the blue" development?
Tightening U.S. monetary policy suggests that the Canadian dollar will remain weak. And in spite of competitiveness concerns, exports are rising enough this year to suggest 10 per cent growth, and an added 6 per cent in 2015. This in turn will spur business investment, lifting Canadian GDP growth to 2.8 per cent in 2015.
Exporters are less upbeat about domestic economic conditions. The balance of opinion for this indicator was the only one to fall, edging back marginally to 13 per cent. Paradoxically, they are more positive about domestic sales, where the balance of opinion rose 9 percentage points to 43 percent of those surveyed.