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Gregor Robertson

Women who are improving their cities for the benefit of all citizens create great hope for bold climate action in the years ahead.
"I think it's important to remember what has happened to our city under 10 years of Vision Vancouver stewardship."
The rezoning application to increase the height and bulk of the building to be erected on 105 Keefer Street in Chinatown
Another week, another weak attempt by the Lower Mainland mayors to pin all the region's problems on the provincial government. Fastballs of problems are flung fast and furious by the city politicians: homelessness, property taxes, TransLink.
A former premier says a "North Dakota type of insurrection" is a possibility in Canada.
“We require — and will require — top experienced global talent."
We have a civic government whose policies seem to be motivated more by sentiment rather than substance, and that's why we have record homelessness and a housing crisis which the city has steadfastly denied for so long.
Leaders have a responsibility to resist their own cynicism and scratch beneath the surface to hear what people -- even those who are opposed -- are saying. What is the core concern driving the speaker? Is it affordability? Safety? Mayors should ask genuine questions of people, and actually listen to their responses
Robertson's vacancy and Airbnb taxes are a significant stumble down a slippery slope. If these new taxes don't raise the vacancy rate high enough, will he go after unoccupied suites in homes? Empty bedrooms? If private housing is now a social good, with its use essentially controlled through tax and regulation, what's to stop these next steps?
Robertson wants a 70 per cent cut in natural gas use by 2020, and 90 per cent gone within 10 years. This will cost individual residents thousands of dollars -- and was approved by Robertson and his council without any thought to the affordability crisis in Vancouver.
In last year's Liberal election platform, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to legalize marijuana, touting a "new system of strict marijuana sales and distribution, with appropriate federal and provincial excise taxes applied." By leaving out the possibility of city taxes, Trudeau raised the hackles of spend-crazy mayors across the nation. Now the mayors are pushing back -- they want a piece of the green.
For months the government had been in denial over the issue: overblown, isolated to a few neighbourhoods, it said. Since then its approach has gone from "the market will correct itself," to a "bold action plan," to legislating a retroactive 15 per cent tax on foreign ownership.
“Vancouver housing is first and foremost for homes, not a commodity to make money with," said Mayor Gregor Robertson.
Check out those interpretive dance moves.
This is neat.
As we increasingly become a nation of urban citizens, it is cities that are leading the way on climate change and renewable energy. So when a city says it's going to go 100 per cent renewable, that definitely got our attention. Vancouver's commitment came in March 2015, and they're not wasting time to put it in place.
Former chief administrator Penny Ballem, 65, will receive $556,000 as a parting gift for the hastily arranged exit. News that undoubtedly warmed the cockles of the hearts of residents across Vancouver when they learned of it.
Hey, Mr. DJ! Keep playin' that song...
Some taxpayers may be willing to accept more costly city services as a result of a living wage policy if they actually helped those most in need. But the evidence shows otherwise.