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Haiti earthquake

Creating something magical out of your life that is greater than you are is the key to a fulfilling life. Serving people and giving them value are just two ways to contribute beyond yourself.
On June 6, much of the world will be celebrating World Environment Day, the annual United Nations day to raise awareness and action for the environment. As the UN puts it, World Environment Day is an "opportunity for everyone to realize the responsibility to care for the Earth and to become agents of change."
Five years after the devastating earthquake that rocked the lives and homes of thousands of Haitian men, women and children, the shadow of that tragic day remains. Thanks to the overwhelmingly generosity of Canadian individuals and support from organizations and government, progress in Port-au-Prince and surrounding areas has been made.
"Most people don't like talking about the earthquake, but someone always asks. It's just so painful to remember." It's my first time visiting Haiti, and while it's as hot as I expected (maybe hotter), I wasn't prepared for the beauty of the country.
Most know Farrow as a celebrated actor for her appearances in more than 50 films, but we know Farrow as our Free The Children Ambassador. We sat down with the actress, who told us what she wants her children to remember about her and why she can't presume to know the world's biggest problems.
Amidst the chaos backstage at We Day Seattle, we found a quiet corner to talk with our good friend, the famed actor and activist. Mia Farrow is fearless. She visited our development projects in Haiti just one year after the 2010 earthquake. We couldn't imagine who she would look up to. So on We Day, we asked her.
When I tell people how much I love to vacation in Haiti, many look at me like I'm a crackhead. It's not unlike the reaction I got when my producing partner and I decided to produce a whole TV series on Israel. For too long, people have tried to oversimplify the complexities of both Haitian and Israeli politics. I'm not equipped to fully assess these complexities but I know this for sure: people are not their governments.
I am absolutely convinced that potential investors will not be disappointed when investing in Haiti. The corruption of yesterday, which was known to harm both local and foreign investors, is today no longer tolerated. We lead a zero tolerance policy when it comes to corruption.
Our survey data confirmed what has long been reflected in humanitarian guidelines, but tragically seems to have been forgotten in post-earthquake Haiti: that people who do not have adequate food, water, and sanitation are at greater risk of rape and other forms of sexual assault.
On the earthquake's second anniversary, the media did their minimum due diligence. They did not report on the hundreds of thousands of Haitians like the Metellus family who remain scattered across Haiti's rural landscape -- the forgotten displaced people.