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handwriting

What if handwriting is once again integral to the worlds of communication and commerce? If so, your kid, down the line, may end up needing handwriting more than we thought. But will she ever be able to achieve real graphic fluency, given that cursive is no longer taught in many schools?
Back in 1982, Cialdini wrote, "Something special happens when people personally put their commitments on paper: they live up to what they have written down." That's why change guru Tony Robbins recommends that people commit their goals to paper. And that is why it would be worth your time to write down your resolutions for change, and to sign the page.
Recent research confirms that those bringing pen and paper back into daily life are on the right track. A study performed at the UCLA showed that jotting notes by hand improves a student's ability to conceptually understand material covered in a lecture, as well as to recall facts, compared to students who took notes on a laptop.
What's most distinctive and troubling to the graphologist is the way Marilyn contorted certain letter formations. What of that ugly claw-like loop that she made when forming a lower zone for the y in her name? And how about that aggressive-looking final stroke on the M that stabs down, penetrating the baseline of the writing and effectively creating a very crude and ugly image of coitus.
The first letter of his surname has been distorted and made into an overarching awning which protects the surname, representing the public self or the professional self. In fact, some of the letters of the last name are tucked away, hidden beneath that dominant arcade, as if tucked away from public view. What do we know about Bill Cosby's private life?
By complying with the traditional way to sign the name from left to right, we comply with this societal model, accepting a choreography that requires the personal self to move, well, away from the personal self. As the expression goes, "get over yourself." And with all that as an introduction, let's revisit Bieber's signature.
Recently, Ellen DeGeneres gave a $10,000 gift to a waitress who treated two National Guard soldiers to their lunch. This act was yet another example of Ellen's generosity, standing alongside the dozens of causes to which she lends her name. Speaking of which, psychological researchers might find a clue to her generosity in her name.
As a psychotherapist, I'm always intrigued by the question of what makes people tick. It's always most important to listen and to ask, but the truth is that people tell a lot about themselves indirectly. Two signatures -- Joan Rivers' and that of former Bloc Québecois leader Gilles Duceppe -- gave me food for thought, as I pondered the psychology of the Separatist.
Paula Deen has admitted to using language that most would call racist, and now her world has officially turned upside down. As a graphologist, I'm intrigued by what we might learn about people by taking a look at their handwriting. Paula Deen is an interesting case in point.
As a therapist who looks at the handwriting of psychotherapy clients in a quest to understand something of the mysterious realm of self and soul, I turned to handwriting in order to better understand Lance Armstrong and his current situation.