HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

harper budget

“Justin is clearly unwilling to meet the requirements of the law because he has no plan nor intention of ever running balanced budgets.”
With a Federal election looming, it is no surprise that the recent budget featured a little bit of everything. After taking care of families with new tax cuts last October, the proposed budget delivers tax relief for seniors and small business owners to widen the appeal.
To reinforce his obvious campaign themes about fear and insecurity, Stephen Harper has taken to describing Canada's current economic situation as a "crisis." If that's his pitch, one should ask under whose watch did this so-called "crisis" develop? Our country is no doubt in an economic mess, but calling it a "crisis" is simply a scare tactic.
Canadians’ views have shifted away from the economic priorities of the Conservative Party over the past decade, a possible
Consumption -- stimulated or not -- never has and never will be the driver of economic growth. It's rightly been said before that the true engine of an economy is savings and investment, whereas consumption is merely the steering wheel.
The Harper Conservatives will force another odious "Omnibus Budget Bill" through the House of Commons this week. For all the verbiage in this budget legislation, the Conservatives are doing little of consequence to deliver what Canadians really need -- i.e., more economic growth and less inequality.
The Conservative government recently introduced C-45, an omnibus bill containing provisions to create a two-tier public sector workforce in this country. Buried in the bill is a provision to raise the age of retirement for all public employees hired after January 1, 2013
When Canada's annual budget deficit came in bigger than expected at $26.2 billion recently, the news didn't spark a sell-off in the markets or an emergency debate in parliament. But that doesn't mean Canadians should be complacent about balancing the budget. As taxpayers, we need to keep our politicians focused controlling costs, keeping taxes affordable, and balancing budgets -- the straight and narrow path that leads us far away from the fiscal cliff.
This hydra-headed Trojan horse budget implementation bill -- where the open-ended omnibus character masks its stealth-like impact -- will have prejudicial fallout in nearly every conceivable domain. Simply put, this legislation and the process of its implementation represents an affront to all Canadians, and Canadians should be appalled by it.
We need a balance between ecology and economics, between the effects of the tar sands and the money it makes. However, this approach does not conform to the narrow and myopic world view of the Harper Conservatives. The Conservative majority rests on less than 40 per cent of the vote, yet for them this justifies demonizing and dismissing the other 60-plus per cent.