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Health Council Of

The move to per capita transfers means that health care transfers will not be based on need, but on population alone. We know there are a number of provinces with smaller populations and many with a disproportionately large number of seniors -- it will cost those provinces more in order to deliver the care they need, when they need it.
Unfortunately, given the current government monopoly on healthcare insurance, the lack of appropriate incentives, and unwillingness to consider policies to reduce wait times that seem to have been successful in European countries with universal health care, it is entirely possible that Canadians may continue to experience some of the longest wait times in the developed world.
The elimination of the Health Council only further underlines this movement away from national planning for better outcomes. That the Council's disappearance is part and parcel of a larger strategy of the elimination of the dissenting and unbiased voice -- something that is so needed in a democracy -- is downright disturbing.
If the current investment in physician compensation was intended to improve the accessibility of medical care, then the data from Quebec show that this was a policy failure. Not only was there no improvement, but the problem actually worsened. In Quebec, it appears we are investing more money to pay more physicians to get less care.
Will Obamacare impact Canadian healthcare policy? It's among the many questions posed to Trudy Lieberman, past president of the Association of Health Care Journalists and press critic for the Columbia Journalism Review. Lieberman cites two major differences between attitudes toward health care in Canada and the United States.