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heart attack

The Queen guitarist has assured fans he's now "in good shape" and "ready to rock" after undergoing surgery.
Doctors say they will consider aspirin for older, high-risk patients.
Researchers tracked the timeline of heart attacks in Sweden, where the main day of celebration is Dec. 24.
The U.S. study is the first to look at a possible link between e-cigarettes and heart attacks.
And don't be afraid to get a second opinion.
Heart disease remains the number one killer of both men and women worldwide. In 2016, actor Carrie Fisher died of a heart attack along with approximately 17.5 million other people around the world. Heart disease has edged out cancer as the leading killer worldwide for the past few years.
It is well-known that heart disease is society's leading killer. In contrast, it is largely unrecognized that people with bipolar disorder are at particularly high risk of heart disease.
Just another reason to adopt the Mediterranean diet.
A young heart is a healthy heart.
Staring up at the constellation Orion on a crisp winter's night, I wonder how much longer I can bear the pain. The pain of
If your cholesterol score is proving tricky to lower, and you've tried other methods, then it's possible these drugs can help you. And the next trick? Cutting the costs for these drugs as effectively as the drugs cut cholesterol levels -- solve that, and we'll be that much closer to a revolution in cardiac care.
Twenty years ago, heart disease was the number one killer of Canadians. That number has dropped over the years thanks in part to research examining the causes of heart attacks and recommendations for better preventative behaviours. Despite this drop, there is still much to be learned about how heart attacks happen. One of the most studied causes is the atherosclerotic lesion, better known as plaque. This accumulation of cells, fats, minerals, and other organic material tend to accumulate in the arteries as we age. If buildup happens to occur in the coronary artery, cardiac arrest may inevitably happen.
Blueberries in particular are showing berry exciting promise as research has linked the consumption of blueberries with a modest decrease in blood pressure in various groups of people with high blood pressure (also known as hypertension).
While the risk of heart trouble increases as you get older, a growing number of people are developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol and other heart disease risk factors at younger ages. Poor lifestyle choices are often to blame, including sedentary living, smoking and unhealthy diets.
The stats are sobering: there are about 70,000 heart attacks in Canada every year, or one every seven minutes. Nearly 16,000
As with many scientific and medical breakthroughs, the discovery of the link between gum and cardiovascular diseases started off rather unexpectedly. Back in 1989, a group in Finland wanted to find out if heart disease could be linked to other chronic diseases. They did the usual blood analysis to detect heart problems and also conducted other medical examinations not unlike what a family doctor might do. They expected something but never imagined they would find a link between the inevitably fatal problems with a rather common condition many of us have: gum disease.
Scientists said Sunday they may have unravelled how chronic stress leads to heart attack and stroke: triggering overproduction
Heart health is a complex study and requires a proper lifestyle to maintain. Yet, as the researchers have shown, should there appear to be signs of problems, such as continual chest pains, palpitations, lightheadedness, shortness of breath and fatigue; there may be yet another option for diagnosis and treatment to avoid a heartbreaking end.
This is a study about gender differences and the first of its kind to look at sex-related differences in and determinants of access to care within a population of younger people who have had heart attacks, McGill University psychologist Dr. Roxanne Pelletier, lead author, told me. "In the last decade the incidence of heart attacks have been increasing in younger people and even more quickly in women compared to men. Our team thinks that gender-related characteristics play a role in that."