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heart disease

Heart disease rates are falling thanks to improvements in treatment.
Pregnancy may cause long-term changes to the body, the study found.
New research also suggests depression can lead to blood clots in limbs.
That includes being divorced or widowed, too.
The vast majority of items are ready-to-eat products that have a characteristic in common: they're ultra-processed foods.
Isabelle Brasseur wants women to stop taking no for an answer during doctor visits.
We can't cure heart disease or diabetes. But we can help prevent or delay them and other chronic illnesses in one vital way -- with a healthier diet. Easier said than done, of course. Most of us consume far too much sugar, saturated fats and salt, largely through highly processed foods. Often without even knowing it.
Natural, nutrient-dense foods are known to help protect against, mitigate and even cure many chronic diseases, slow the effects of aging and promote longevity. They are able to do so by decreasing and controlling inflammation in the body, which is at the root of many ailments and a major contributor to premature aging.
Pine nuts are edible seeds that come from the cones of pine trees, making them labor-intensive to produce. Not surprisingly, they're expensive to buy (ever made pesto?). But considering their nourishing array of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, pine nuts offer a wide variety of health benefits to older adults.
Heart exercise, simply put, is aerobic exercise--a form of physical activity that causes you to breathe harder and your heart to pump faster, circulating blood through your veins so oxygen can get to the working muscles -- your heart is a muscle, see the connection?
By bringing attention to the breath throughout the day we can cultivate self-awareness. Something as simple as learning to breathe properly can have a significant impact on both your body and mind, leaving you feeling more efficient, productive and energized!
It is well-known that heart disease is society's leading killer. In contrast, it is largely unrecognized that people with bipolar disorder are at particularly high risk of heart disease.
'Tis the season to make new year resolutions. For many, that often means vowing to commit to a new diet - again. And let's be frank, we certainly aren't restricted for choice of diets. The diet landscape is glutted with plans that promise rapid weight loss, yet fail to deliver.
In a recent study, researchers weigh-in on the conventional wisdom that supercharging your "good" cholesterol to very high levels can help reduce the risk of heart disease. What they found instead was that both low levels of the cholesterol -- known as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) - and very high levels could lead to a higher risk of death.
Nutrition can be a complex subject with many factors and variables influencing health and disease. Despite consumer trends moving towards a more balanced approach to nutrition, rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are still on the rise in Canada and the United States. To decrease your chances of developing chronic lifestyle diseases, let's explore my top three diet tips that will help you stay on track with your healthy living strategy.
It's not only back pain we're talking about.
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According to polls, most of us think of ourselves as healthy, despite the fact that the obesity crisis keeps growing and
Here's the sobering truth: despite close to 40 years of substantial private and public investment, society has not come up with any meaningful medication to help those with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Today, some 750,000 Canadians live with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.
For people who have heart disease, have suffered a heart attack or who have an implantable heart device, resuming sexual activity can be concerning. Is sex safe, or will it increase the risk of complications or death? At a recent Sunnybrook Speaker Series event, cardiologist Dr. David Newman examined the topic and offered some sound guidance.
Just another reason to adopt the Mediterranean diet.