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The Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act (S-214), a bill to end cosmetic animal testing in Canada, passed its second reading in the Senate and is being studied in committee before making its way to the House of Commons. It's currently the only piece of legislation that addresses a very specific (and unnecessary) area of animal testing.
Cosmetic animal testing is still legal in eight out of every 10 countries worldwide, including Canada. So we are asking Canadians to join us in a #DayofAction on September 13 to urge our elected officials in Ottawa to get behind the Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act and make Canada the next country to #BeCrueltyFree.
Rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, hamsters and rats are made to suffer in archaic chemical poisoning tests all in the name of beauty. Common tests include chemicals dripped into their eyes; skin irritation tests, and oral toxicity tests where mega-doses are force-fed into an animal's stomach to observe signs of poisoning.
Every second of every day, over 2,400 land animals are killed for food. To add insult to injury, animal agriculture is one of the most significant contributors to climate change.
The rewards of eating conscientiously, healthfully, and humanely aren't exclusive to the planet and animals; happily, for everyone joining the meat, egg, and dairy-free movement this year, plant-based eating has never been easier or more enjoyable -- especially if you keep a few important tips in mind.
Right now, the majority of Canadian egg-laying hens are confined in cages that deny them almost every basic need, including the chance to even walk around or fully stretch their wings. It's mind-boggling that these archaic cages are still used almost two decades into the 21st century, when innovation has transformed most industries several times over in recent years alone. Fortunately, the food industry is finally realizing that "we've always done it this way" isn't a good reason to keep doing something.
This week, we saw massive public support translate into real change when New Brunswick Senator Stewart Olsen launched a federal bill to ban cosmetics animal testing and trade in Canada. It is a huge victory for #BeCrueltyFree Canada, and vindication for all the rabbits, mice and other animals who have been blinded, poisoned and killed in the name of beauty.
It is fast becoming apparent that the Newfoundland government "investment" in the commercial seal slaughter is simply a make-work project. Encouraging fishermen to make economic decisions based on markets that will never materialize serves only the executives of the seal processors. More than 35 nations have already prohibited their trade in the primary products of Canada's commercial seal slaughter and there is no future in commercial sealing. It is time the Canadian and provincial governments put their support behind a fair sealing industry buyout.
Commercial sealing advocates find it exceptionally difficult to win hearts and minds with the truth. Because the truth is an industrial scale, non-aboriginal slaughter in which defenseless seal pups less than three months of age are horribly beaten and shot to death for their fur. It is a wasteful kill, in which the carcasses are normally dumped at sea.
In the wake of a shocking investigation into a fox and mink fur factory farm last August by the Quebec Ministry of Forests, Fauna and Parks, the fur industry's PR machine has subjected the public to a slew of spin, hoping to obfuscate and isolate the troubling findings.