HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Humane Society International

For the first time ever, the ocean protection community is commemorating World Oceans Day without one of its biggest champions, Canadian conservationist and filmmaker Rob Stewart. More than ever though, we are reminded of the movement he inspired with his 2006 film "Sharkwater," to stop the extinction-level crisis facing many shark species.
The Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act (S-214), a bill to end cosmetic animal testing in Canada, passed its second reading in the Senate and is being studied in committee before making its way to the House of Commons. It's currently the only piece of legislation that addresses a very specific (and unnecessary) area of animal testing.
The Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act passed its second reading on December 14th, 2016 with strong Senate support. If the act becomes law, it seeks to ban cosmetic animal testing in Canada and the sale of cosmetic products and ingredients that have been newly tested on animals outside of the country.
Experts say he's showing signs of mental decline.
Cosmetic animal testing is still legal in eight out of every 10 countries worldwide, including Canada. So we are asking Canadians to join us in a #DayofAction on September 13 to urge our elected officials in Ottawa to get behind the Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act and make Canada the next country to #BeCrueltyFree.
The beauty industry makes people look and feel beautiful, but it is horrifically ugly when it comes to the treatment of animals in laboratories. Throughout the world, hundreds of thousands of animals endure unnecessary suffering and eventually die from animal testing for cosmetics annually.
Although bans on cosmetic animal testing are in effect in several countries, Canada still allows it. There is absolutely no need to test on animals for cosmetics anymore. We have thousands of safe ingredients that already exist, as well as many testing alternatives.
Animal suffering is tough for anyone to stomach. It doesn't matter if you've been on the frontlines of animal welfare all your life because it never gets easier to look at. But what about cases of extreme abuse, where cruelty is so unthinkable that most people can't even comprehend its existence? Just weeks ago, the Humane Society International Animal Rescue team travelled to Yulin to expose this cruel festival to the world. What they saw was horrific -- dogs and cats crammed in cages, awaiting the same fate as the dogs and cats being slaughtered in front of them.
This week, we saw massive public support translate into real change when New Brunswick Senator Stewart Olsen launched a federal bill to ban cosmetics animal testing and trade in Canada. It is a huge victory for #BeCrueltyFree Canada, and vindication for all the rabbits, mice and other animals who have been blinded, poisoned and killed in the name of beauty.
Our eating habits currently sanction the slaughter of nearly two million chickens per day, the vast majority of whom are treated by the industry as meat-producing machines, forced to live through a mechanized, hellish experience. If your local SPCA habitually allowed dogs and cats to languish with excruciating injuries, or turned a blind eye while countless animals in its care died during transport, it would be rightly shut down by provincial inspectors. Yet the routinely barbaric abuse of chickens is an uncomfortable reality that exists nationwide -- a direct result of the high demand for legs, breasts and wings.
To date, more than 35 nations have prohibited trade in products of commercial seal hunts. Yet for the third time in the past four years, the Newfoundland government is providing a multimillion-dollar bailout to commercial seal processors in an attempt to prop up the dying sealing industry.
Keeping wild animals trapped in cages and killing them by gassing or anal electrocution is inherently inhumane, and the toxic runoff from fur farms and the chemicals used to treat fur are extraordinarily harmful to the environment. This is why Humane Society International/Canada and thousands of Canadians are calling for a federal ban on fur farming.
Seventy per cent of illegal ivory ends up in China -- the world's largest ivory consumer, as the insatiable demand for the "white gold" is surging with the growing middle class populous. The root cause of this insane craving for ivory is ignorance. According to the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), more than 70 per cent of Chinese don't realize that elephants are being killed for their ivory.
Humane Society International's #BeCrueltyFree campaign is giving the beauty industry a makeover worldwide, leading negotiations with governments and companies to put an end to cosmetics animal testing -- forever.
Every dog has its day but two particular puppies are getting an extra few more thanks to the work of a doctor. Doctor Peter
Meat-free grilling is a simple solution to a complex problem. Supply and demand issues and the outbreak of a deadly diarrheal virus on North American pig farms have sent meat prices through the roof in the last year. Yet the truth is, the meat on our supermarket shelves has been unrealistically cheap for a long time.
Imagine being stuck in that claustrophobic, windowless space, with no chance of escape. Imagine the first hour. The first week. Imagine spending a month straight in that space, with no sunlight, unable even to turn your body around, and nothing to do. Now multiply that month about 40 times; that is the life of most mother pigs in the pork industry.
n March 27, the House of Commons had the opportunity to pass a private members bill put forth by NDP member Fin Donnelly to ban the importation of shark fins to Canada. The Conservative party however, decided that fighting to save sharks and represent the Canadian popular will was not part of their mandate and struck the bill down 143 votes to 138.
Since 2004, the XL plant has gone from slaughtering 2,400 cows per day to 4,000. It should be no surprise that many workers have been decrying the massive increase in production line speed. Not only does speeding up production lines have terrible consequences for animal welfare, such as failing to properly stun animals before slaughter, it may also have serious consequences for food safety in this country.