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illegal downloading

Some 55,000 Canadians may soon be named in a “reverse class action" lawsuit for sharing movies online. For each violation, Voltage Pictures wants to extract up to $5,000 — the maximum amount allowed. Experts warn that the suit is part of a trend of "troll-type activity in Canada now that is driving normal people crazy," according to a report by The Globe and Mail.
If you torrent all your movies, this one's for you.
The evidence suggests piracy is not hurting Canadian producers the way Bell's coalition would have you believe.
This provides a modern solution to promote the free flow of legal content in Canada, while making it harder for piracy sites to cause harm.
The prospect of considering expanded blocking for copyright purposes validates the fears of civil liberties groups that the introduction of blocking requirements invariably expands to cover a wider net of content. Canadian copyright was already on track for a boisterous debate in the coming years with changes such as copyright term extension mandated by the Trans Pacific Partnership and a review of the law scheduled for 2017. If government officials envision adding VPN usage, access to U.S. Netflix and website blocking to the list of issues, copyright could emerge as one of the government's most difficult and controversial issues.
Nearly one in five Canadians who watched “Game of Thrones” in the first week of the new season did so through piracy, more
I've received daily emails from people who have been sent a copyright infringement notification as part of Canada's notice-and-notice system. While I'm unable to provide specific legal advice, I can provide more information that may assist in making an informed decision about a system that was designed to discourage infringement.
Canada has allowed itself to become a “haven” for online piracy, and the country’s inaction on the issue is forcing other
Rightscorp, a U.S.-based anti-piracy company, is using Canada's new copyright notice-and-notice system to require Internet providers to send threats and misstatements of Canadian law in an effort to extract payments based on unproven infringement allegations. Not only does Moore bear some responsibility for establishing the notice-and-notice rules without regulations, but there is now no quick fix.
Canadians who partake in unauthorized downloading will have a new fear in the new year. Well, sort of. Starting Jan. 1, internet
The Harper government’s Digital Privacy Act is being billed as “protection for Canadians when they surf the web and shop
Unauthorized file-sharers, take a deep breath. Your day of judgment hasn’t arrived quite yet. A federal judge in Toronto
The Canadian Internet community has been buzzing for the past week over reports that a Montreal-based company has captured data on one million Canadians who it says have engaged in unauthorized file sharing. While that represents a relatively small percentage of Internet users in Canada, the possibility of hundreds of thousands of lawsuits over alleged copyright infringement would be unprecedented and raise a host of legal and policy issues.
Over the past couple of days, there have been multiple reports about the return of file sharing lawsuits to Canada, with fears that thousands of Canadians could be targeted. While it is possible that many will receive demand letters, it is important to note that recent changes to Canadian copyright law limit liability in non-commercial cases to a maximum of $5,000 for all infringement claims.
A Canadian copyright enforcement group has collected data on one million people who allegedly participated in illegal file