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immigration reform

They are already placing conditions on their support that could kill the effort entirely.
Nearly 800,000 young undocumented immigrants at risk for deportation.
What we have is an untenable situation and one which the Canadian prime minister should right immediately.
To those politicians today with the power to compel people to your will with fear and anti-immigration sentiment -- stop blaming immigrants for neoliberal policies that relentlessly concentrate wealth at the top while leaving the majority with weakened social programs, poverty, uncertainty and fear.
The ratio of working-age Canadians to seniors was narrowing, and the inevitable outcome would be a shrunken tax base and acute labour shortages. Over the next decade, a million jobs risk going unfilled. And yet, only around one in 10 Canadians agrees that Canada currently admits too few immigrants. The annual (and sometimes multi-year) public consultations held by the Federal Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration on levels of newcomers do not seem to have yielded much success in changing this attitude.
Canada is a dream come true for those who immigrate here. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms is the envy of the world. Its multiculturalism welcomes new immigrants with open arms, open hearts and open minds. If new immigrants are to become a part of the Canadian multicultural fabric they must know what their obligations as Canadian resident/citizen would be.
Throughout our history, Canada has welcomed newcomers with a smile. They were -- and are -- nation builders. Under the Conservatives, this smile has become a scowl and we have unfortunately witnessed a decade of decline in three major areas: family reunification, refugees, and citizenship applicants.
One obvious solution would be to distribute enough temporary work visas for the farmers to be able to hire the workers they need legally. The positive aspects of the Bracero program should be revived, while eschewing its mistakes. This would not solve all of the country's illegal immigration problems. But it would certainly be better than the further militarization of the US-Mexico border.
PM Harper, Kenney and his crew have been careful not speak publicly on immigration matters. But Kenney slipped up while unrolling the red carpet for the Irish, not long after he cancelled 300,000 patiently-waiting skilled workers' applications. "The employers in Canada are increasingly identifying Ireland as a great source of talent, hard-working, highly-educated folks who are culturally compatible," Kenney said.
Canada's temporary foreign worker policy is at odds with Canadian values, and frankly, this is getting a bit awkward. If you're like me, you're beginning to want to apologize to the people who serve us fast food. And maybe we should apologize, though it's not our fault. If I could send a message to the Minister of Immigration I would tell him to be more pragmatic about the foreign worker problem. Not only is this easy to fix, it's imperative. It can make you look good, it's good for Canada, and you can turn this problem into a lot of new Canadian voters who'll love you.