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indiegogo

More than half of all homeless dogs in Canada exist in the Northernmost parts of the provinces. Iqaluit is no different. The Iqaluit Humane Society (IHS) faces a lot of unique challenges -- it's not easy running one of the most isolated shelters in the world, with minimal staff, funding and resources.
Santa, make our wish come true (for the sake of technology).
There's no denying it -- docs are hot. Between HBO's high-gloss productions, Netflix's rise in documentaries, the influx of Kickstarter/Indieigogo campaigns, and the democratization of filmmaking gear via iPhones and cheap cameras, docs are everywhere. So you dream of making a doc?
While crowdfunding sites were created to give the underdog a chance and essentially foster free enterprise where start-ups are concerned, it never occurred to me to use these platforms as an opportunity to raise funds for personal pursuits. Especially something as personal as adopting a baby. But does that make it wrong, unethical or crass, even? What do you think? If you had a friend or family member crowdfunding an adoption, would you contribute?
Moving forward, we must never forget that we have the power to keep the peace, with every act, however great or small, and to shape Ottawa -- and the rest of the world -- now and for future generations.
The crowd funding fatigue that I saw setting in about a year ago has dissipated and it seems to have entered into the public-norm. It's here, and it's here to stay. And like everything in this world it can't be painted with an over-all brush.
2014-02-12-its_all_geek_to_me.png I love crowdfunding, because it's like watching money have a wrestling match with ideas. It's capitalism in microcosm. It's important to not lose sight of the lesson here: Crowdfunding websites are not responsible for anything that happens once you've contributed. You are leaving your money on the table, walking away, and hoping for the best.
Peterborough, Ont. mother Susan Nelson has launched an impassioned Indiegogo campaign to help save her daughter Ingrid, who
Kickstarter, the crowdfunding website that has served as a platform for thousands of projects to date, just celebrated three