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infrastructure

The infrastructure minister joined Premier Doug Ford at a conference about public-private partnerships.
What if the bridge, tunnel, dam or highway came with significant benefits to your community?
When plans for big infrastructure projects roll out, they should be guided by the basic principals of public procurement:competition, fairness and value.
Failure to address these concerns before it's too late might regrettably mean a long period of decline.
It's becoming more and more apparent that BC Hydro has been playing a bit loose with telling the truth, the whole truth.
While other global jurisdictions are building the great cities of tomorrow, excellent places to invest and live, Canada is lurching along hesitantly.
If our economy is shifting, how much emphasis do we really need to place on filling predicted shortages and attracting more young people to the trades? While we focus so much on the digital space, we can't forget that Canada is about to make massive investments in physical infrastructure.
Mr. Tory is no transit messiah. In fact, he has been instrumental in ensuring that public transit investments in Toronto are based not on scientific evidence, but on political brinkmanship.
The federal deficit is rising, far beyond the $10 billion projected in the Liberal's election platform. The stated purpose of running $130 billion of deficits over five years is to stimulate the Canadian economy, whose prospects for growth are deteriorating.
The first is coping with the inexorable trend towards urbanization. By 2036, over 60 per cent of the world's population will reside in cities. The burgeoning number of urban dwellers worldwide will put pressure on city governments in areas ranging from housing to services, infrastructure to transportation.
Ottawa's most important policy response to lagging growth has been a return to that great theme of Canadian history: building. Sixty per cent of Canada's GDP depends on trade. Canadians need to build now to get our goods and services to the growing global middle class, projected to grow from 1.8 billion today to five billion by 2030.
This new federal funding was earmarked in Justin Trudeau's first budget last March. In a one-time "Strategic Investment Fund for Post-Secondary Institutions," it totals $2 billion nationally over the next two years.
People around the world love the Olympics. The Games bring nations together and promote peace through friendly competition. They tell life-affirming stories of humanity's endurance and drive and the capabilities of our bodies. They bring joy to so many that we need to devise some way to stop them from also bringing so much pain in the form of billions of dollars of debt.
Politicians across Canada trot out transit ridership forecasts that support their favourite projects. In the pretext of following evidence-based decision-making, many equate projections with evidence. They are sadly mistaken.
I think I'm reasonably well versed in issues surrounding the Energy East Pipeline, both economic and environmental. But I am struck by how, in any official TransCanada communications about environmental implications of the project, climate change is never mentioned.
Politics aside, the concept behind infrastructure spending in theory makes sense: with interest rates near all-time lows and little expectation of them going up in the short term, now is probably as a good a time as any to borrow money and put it to work.
To some, it's the shared economy disrupting the old business models. To others, it's the gig economy that denies workers full-time hours and a living wage. Regardless of its name, the new economy is disrupting more than the established business norms. It is forcing grown-ups to live with their parents and is likely causing the decline in public transit ridership.
The Wynne government doesn't have a long-term infrastructure plan that includes an accurate description of the current condition of the province's assets, including roads and buildings. That is to say that there is no reliable estimate of Ontario's infrastructure deficit -- a crucial factor in making evidence-based, properly planned investment decisions
The proposed budget will increase government spending while having a deficit of $29.4 billion. It will direct billions of dollars to infrastructure spending, First Nations, and the middle class and lower income groups.
To encourage the construction of affordable rental housing, Budget 2016 proposes to invest $208.3 million over five years, starting in 2016-17, in an Affordable Rental Housing Innovation Fund administered by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.