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Intellectual Property

If you torrent all your movies, this one's for you.
The pact that Canada is being urged to join looks a lot like the "bad deal" Trudeau vowed to reject.
It's happened an enormous amount recently and it grinds my gears. You may be asking, but isn't imitation the highest form of flattery? No, it's not. It's irritating as all hell.
A review of the list of consultations on the government's website and tweets by minister Freeland show a number of meetings with these particular TPP critics. All of this raises the question of whether the minister is hearing the alternative positive case for the TPP.
The prospect of considering expanded blocking for copyright purposes validates the fears of civil liberties groups that the introduction of blocking requirements invariably expands to cover a wider net of content. Canadian copyright was already on track for a boisterous debate in the coming years with changes such as copyright term extension mandated by the Trans Pacific Partnership and a review of the law scheduled for 2017. If government officials envision adding VPN usage, access to U.S. Netflix and website blocking to the list of issues, copyright could emerge as one of the government's most difficult and controversial issues.
Beyond the war of statistics, the principles of liberty and personal responsibility must be brought back to the heart of discussions about tobacco consumption, or consumption of any other product deemed "harmful" to one's health. You don't need to be a radical libertarian to start to ask some serious questions regarding the tendency of certain groups to want to regiment all aspects of people's lives under the pretext of protecting their health.
The Harper government has introduced an extension of copyright terms as part of the federal budget, in a move that is likely
Tech giants like Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb have entered unchartered policy territory where ethics debates, grey areas and government relations are the daily norm. While the seeming nuisance of having to deal with all these new policy implications all at once may seem cumbersome, the economic benefits and progress that has been made far outweigh the work.
As the CETA negotiations have progressed, our community has seen an opportunity to make Canada a more attractive destination for global investment in health research by modernizing our Intellectual Property rules as they pertain to the life sciences.
The fashion industry has never really been big on patent lawsuits. In fact, they barely exist, but yogawear maker Lululemon
Even if you don't share my live-and-let-live philosophy, there are some pragmatic and empirical arguments to be made against several of the measures promoted by the very well-organized and very well-funded worldwide anti-tobacco movement.
The federal government is staying quiet on reports it has caved to U.S. demands on intellectual property and copyright issues
Focusing only on the cost increases associated with stronger (but still lagging) intellectual property protection for pharmaceutical innovators is simplistic and wrong. It is the balance of these costs and benefits that are the ultimate determinant of whether or not Canadians are better off, not just the post-2023 increase in drug costs to provincial governments, patients, and insurers.
A trade agreement Canada intends to sign will have “far-reaching implications for individual rights and civil liberties,” WikiLeaks
It is Canada's challenge to ensure this country is attractive to those who are making the decisions on where to invest their dollars for the discovery and development of innovative new treatments. So while critics try to dismiss stronger IP as nothing more than a technique to pad the bottom line of a faceless corporation, for millions of Canadians it could be a matter of life and breath.
Canadian regulations clearly restrict access to new medical innovations by placing a general ban on their use until Health Canada completes duplicate reviews already undertaken (earlier and faster) by regulators in Europe and the U.S. Regulators in these jurisdictions bear responsibility for the health and safety of populations that dwarf Canada's population of less than 35 million. Canada's current approach imposes considerable delays on Canadians struggling with illness. A closer look suggests the delays did much more than cause needless discomfort.
If you need to build connections from scratch, be fearless. Pick up the phone. Write the letter or email. At conferences and social events, approach people and be approachable. Be clear about your value proposition and needs. Ask how you may help them, and ask for support. What's the worst that can happen? They politely decline.
Big Media lobbyists and unelected bureaucrats are holding closed-door meetings in Malaysia this week, as they continue secret talks on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) -- a highly secretive and extreme trade deal that includes extreme new copyright rules that could end the open Internet as we know it.
Here at OpenMedia.ca, we've already been hearing from Canadians outraged that our own Members of Parliament are still being denied access to the TPP text -- access that has now been granted to their counterparts in Washington D.C. We know that Canadians will not accept their Members of Parliament being kept in the dark
We haven't heard much out of the World Trade Organization since 2005, when the US government decided to continue subsidizing corporate farms rather than forge a global trade deal. Yet the WTO machinery keeps grinding on -- and grinding poor countries down.