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Star Wars: The Force Awakens might be taking us to a galaxy, far, far away, but way, way before even the first Star Wars did so, another science-fiction film took us much, much farther. Fifty years ago this week, six astronauts posed on the moon for a selfie-ish photograph next to a newly uncovered three million-year old alien artifact.
By now the dust has settled from Apple's launch event on Wednesday, and you've probably had a chance to read the recaps from the two hours worth of announcements. Based on the live Twitter stream and the post-event recaps, there are a few things everyone can agree on: first, the media had it pretty spot-on in their predictions for the event.
Mobile computing devices including the standby chargers, which provide life support to battery-starved smartphones or tablets, are adding pounds to the bags dangling from our aching shoulders. For the sake of our shoulders and spine, we need fewer and lighter devices.
Findings revealed that participants who read on an iPad produced 55 per cent less melatonin. Melatonin is a hormone that tends to increase in the evening to induce sleepiness and regulate sleep. It is also a strong anti-inflammatory known to suppress cancer cell growth. When melatonin levels decrease they can shift the body's circadian rhythm and make it difficult to fall asleep.
Last year, when he was in Grade 5, we both had access to iPads -- his through a gift using my brother's Save-On More points, mine through my school principal -- and we both began to explore the potential of this technology.
A decade ago, I composed a foreword to a book called "Business Skills for Creative Souls." A corporate primer for artistic
Have you noticed what's happening at airports? Gone are the days where your only choice is grabbing unhealthy, fat-laden food or having to settle for pre-packaged on-board food options as you make a mad dash for a flight.
Apple announced its new iPad and iPad Mini at an event on Tuesday. The latest generation of Apple's popular tablets, the
A heist is going down in Toronto and you're invited to infiltrate a secret world of operatives, agents and radicals. All you need is your iPhone. F/, a Toronto-based dance company, has created Jacqueries; a promenade-style dance/theatre hybrid layered with digital elements that audiences experience via an iPhone app.
As busy as we are, we would never leave our toddlers alone in a park. We shouldn't leave our kids on the Internet alone either. Luckily there are many ways to make online time safe for our children.
Reading on my smartphone, tablet or e-reader doesn't give me the same thrill as reading an old-fashioned paper book. But why would I stop by the bookstore, or visit the local library, when I can download the latest books in seconds? Does society need paper books any more?
The new iPad mini is the perfect size for my junior kindergartener. However, does a JK really warrant owning a computer? I tend to think not. Already it seems there is this mad scramble going on to ensure that our kids are equally if not more tech-savvy than their peers. There is plenty of time to hone his keypad skills but the window for developing his imagination seems to close a little every day.
What will Apple do next? What is the technology that will disrupt the iPhone and iPad business? If you have read Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs biography (and I strongly recommend that you do), there was a very telling (and compelling) line from Jobs: "If you don't cannibalize yourself, someone else will."
Paint My Cat, created in Vancouver, is a new app that's creative, artistic, educational, and great family fun. This sure isn't what my kids had for coloring books. It's created by a dad who sees a really big picture.
While technology like smartphones, tablets and such seem at first glance to be aimed at the young and hip, it's those in need of replacement hips who will be the biggest winners as technology continues to transform our daily lives bit by byte. When you can Skype with your grandchildren, email your children or keep in touch with old and new friends via Facebook, you don't feel as isolated. For chronic diseases that afflict the elderly, like diabetes and heart disease, there are now so many easy-to-use apps and gadgets to monitor blood-sugar levels, blood pressure and more. Maybe you can teach an old dog new tricks.
A friend of mine introduced me to the term "topless meetings." Before you forward this to your HR manager, the expression refers to a tabletop staying free of devices during meetings. No laptops. No iPhones. No iPads. No Blackberries. Nothing that requires a charge. The idea underpinning device-free meetings is that such gadgets can prove more distracting than helpful.
Anonymous sub-group Anti-Sec supposedly holds in its hands 12-million Apple user IDs it acquired from hacking. The hacktivist group refuses to release the IDs until -- wait for it -- Adrien Chen of Gawker poses on the front page of the site in a ballet tutu with a shoe on top of his head. It remains to be seen whether Anonymous does have anything to give the public it strives to supposedly protect, or whether this was just another one of their pranks done "for the lulz," that is to say, for the stroking of their own vanity.
When the iPad came along, instead of the stylus, the new modality is touch, whether to pinch, scroll or "click." So how should a brand think about this whole "touch" revolution? Touch is a powerful and special thing. There are five easy steps to consider for both tablet and smartphone development.
I think, like Facebook, Apple has peaked. As I type this on my MacBook Pro -- the "entry-level" model from a few years ago, a computer that is powerful enough to record, edit and multitrack an entire album or batch process hundreds of images at a time -- I wonder why I need such a powerful machine?
Retail has been turned on its head. Consumers are actively using mobile devices in larger stores to access hundreds of e-commerce, forums and social sites that hold product information, reviews and competitive pricing. What to do to counter this? Well, we need to arm salespeople with mobile devices that give them that extra advantage and ignore the hard sell and just be really personable and informative using external and internal resources.