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Irwin Cotler

What needs to be made clear is that most Canadians challenging this motion are not challenging the issues facing the Muslim communities, or that racism does not exist; what they are uncomfortable with in this motion is the fact that it is favouring one community over others.
Badawi has been languishing in a Saudi prison since his first arrest in 2012, and his subsequent sentencing in 2014 to 10 years imprisonment and 1000 lashes, itself constitutive of torture and a standing violation of international human rights law. Raif Badawi's "crime"? Establishing an online forum and exercising his right to freedom of expression.
The battle in Mount Royal is representative of a larger fight between Liberals and Conservatives.
One very telling trait in a prospective candidate's makeup is their ability to ascribe whatever success they may have had thus far in their careers to the influence or assistance of others. Often they will speak of a mentor or a series of mentors as pivotal figures. One very special mentor and teacher of mine is the Honourable Irwin Cotler.
MP Larry Miller, who once used Hitler and the Nazis as references to oppose the gun registry, also recently made a dumb comment about how prospective Canadians should "stay the hell where you came from" if they prefer to wear a niqab during a Canadian citizenship ceremony. He is one of a long line of Conservative MPs to make racist remarks. I hope racism, ignorance and stupidity are not becoming mainstream Canadian values, let alone values endorsed by the Conservative Party of Canada. I hope the Prime Minister understands in his awkward silence, he is giving the impression that he is actually endorsing all the ills we have seen from members of his caucus in recent months. He should not.
And Michelle Simson, who was a Liberal MP from 2008 to 2011, said she was "ashamed" of her party's decision. She suggested
While protests for greater democratic rights continue in Hong Kong, some fear there could be a crackdown similar to what occurred in Tiananmen Square in 1989. Below is a list of the MPs who made reference to Tiananmen on or around June 4 during the past 15 years.
When Russia issued its blacklist of 13 Canadians on Monday, Irwin Cotler was quick to express his honour at being included
Many of the 13 Canadians banned by Russia Monday say they're actually quite honoured by the move. Liberal MPs Chrystia Freeland
Thus, as the world prepares to gather in Russia in the Olympic spirit of unity and fellowship, those Russians who have been and still are victimized and persecuted by their own government must be front-of-mind. Indeed, their cause -- and that of Sergei Magnitksy -- must continue to burn brightly even after the extinguishing of Sochi's Olympic flame.
OTTAWA - Irwin Cotler, the longtime Montreal Liberal MP, former justice minister and human rights advocate, won't be running
Israel is very relevant to Olivia Chow's candidacy because some of the major proponents of the "Israel as apartheid state" and the BDS movement are key supporters of Olivia Chow and with whom she is identified. It is now time for Ms. Chow to take responsibility for her silence.
Quebec's Human Rights Commission has taken the highly unusual step of commenting on a government proposal, delivering one of the most forceful rebukes yet to the Parti Québécois' Charter of Quebec Values. According to the Commission, the values charter would represent "a clear break" with Quebec's Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms.
As expected, the provincial government's proposed Charter of Quebec Values contains a highly problematic ban on religious symbols or attire for all public sector employees. The Charter's supporters argue that it is necessary to protect the religious neutrality of the Quebec state, but that argument is based on a number of faulty premises, such as: The state cannot be religiously neutral if public employees wear religious items; religious identity can be "turned off" during business hours; religious symbols in the workplace undermine gender equality and that certain Catholic symbols in public institutions are cultural or historical, but faith-based accessories worn by public employees are religious.
The so-called "charter of values" being contemplated by our provincial government would make a mockery of the free and open society that many of Quebec's nationalist leaders have been promoting for decades. It would force religious Quebecers "into the closet", and send the message that religious adherence is something to be ashamed of. Moreover, if religious symbols are barred from the public sphere, they and those who wear them will be rendered even more foreign and separate from the majority. Far from encouraging integration, therefore, such a ban would reinforce divisions based on religious affiliation.
In February 2012, amidst the then unfolding horror in Syria, British journalist Marie Colvin summed it up in one final poignant and painful dispatch before she herself was murdered in the assault on Homs: "In Baba Amr. Sickening. Cannot understand how the world can stand by... Feeling helpless... No one here can understand how the international community can let this happen."
Bulgarian authorities have confirmed and have transmitted evidence of Hezbollah terrorist complicity to European Union foreign ministers meeting in Brussels next Monday to determine whether Hezbollah should be designated as a terrorist organization.
So I ask: How can the government champion one bill that promotes corporate accountability abroad while simultaneously opposing another, when both have the capacity to positively impact the way our companies conduct business? I cannot reconcile this disparity easily. Perhaps it lies with the simple fact that C-474 is not a Conservative bill.
Iranians overwhelmingly elected a "moderate" cleric, Hassan Rowhani, as President, an outcome that has been hailed as a harbinger of positive change. Rowhani is probably not as moderate as his campaign speeches suggest, and Iran's Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei remains the repressive autocrat he has always been. Yet, the new Iranian President has clearly been successful by reflecting the democratic sensibilities of the population, while the Ayatollah desires to legitimate the aging theocratic regime; perhaps both will begin to see the benefits of a softer tone. But will a change in tone presage a change in substance?
Think of the many cultures throughout history that have disappeared, some for which we've no account, and others now only known by artifacts or bits and pieces of written history. Rather than focus on the cultures that have been lost, First Nations can focus on the one that has survived thousands of years,